UNIPORT CENTRES

CENTRE FOR CONFLICT AND GENDER STUDIES

 

 

INTRODUCTION
 

Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies in the University of Port Harcourt was at her beginning two separate Centres---Centre for Ethnic and Conflict Studies (CENTECS) and Patience Jonathan Centre for Gender and Women Development Studies (PJC-GWDS).[1] The merger serves both academic and practical interests of a well-acknowledged synergetic relationship between gender and peace and conflict studies.  Gender straddles both fields in significant ways. At the same time, it occupies an important position in awakening debates and policies where the fields are highly welcomed. Like creatures designed to smoothly cohabit, the original mandates for CENTECS AND PJC-GWDS, which border on research, teaching and community service, are now being pursued as one Centre since the official merger by the university authority in the last quarter of 2015.  This is a bold initiative, to expand and enhance services in the areas of Conflict and Gender Studies, and contribute to the development of the fields of study in Nigeria. The merger has meant larger mandate and responsibilities for the management of the Centre.

 

The Centre conducts research, which provides useful evidence-based information for tackling conflict, especially those affecting the immediate environment and neighbouring states in the South-South region of the country.  It has the potential to becoming a leading institution in the subfields of Peace and Conflict and Gender Studies in Africa. The Centre then is poised to make relevant contributions via teaching, research and community service, so as to help address development challenges in a developing economy where many citizens suffer severe security threats posed by violent conflicts, poverty, illiteracy, violence, human trafficking and gender inequality.

 

The Centre partners with a number of organizations in the areas of research, capacity building and knowledge-driven advocacy.

 


ABOUT US
 

Vision

Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies seeks to be the best in Africa when it comes to peace, conflict and gender research, teaching, training and community service.  CCGS is well positioned to be a leading hub of peace, conflict and gender research and practice in Africa. 

 

Philosophy

Commitment to intellectual and professional excellence is our concern.

 


Mission

To apply relevant skills and competences toward evidence-based policy research in peace, conflict and gender studies;  to achieve sustainable peace and development, to equip male and female populations with knowledge of economic, social, political and cultural problems that hinder human development at the community, national and international fronts. 

 

Goals and Objectives

1.       To make CCGS a centre of excellence in peace, conflict  and Gender studies

2.       To generate and transfer knowledge in conflict and peace dynamics through research and teaching  

including professional workshops

3.       To build capacity for sustainability through CCGS programmes and institutionalizing peace practice

 

WHAT WE DO

·          Professional development and capacity building in conflict mainstreaming and  

·         peace practice

·          Increasing awareness of peace research and conflict issues in academic and

·         public forums

·          Publication of a journal on emerging issues in the Niger-Delta (African Conflicts

·         Profile)

·          Publication of the Monograph Series

·          Providing a database for understanding conflicts through our surveys and funded

·         research

 Design manuals for training workshops and courses in peace and conflict studies

·          Investigate conflict situations and write technical reports on resolution strategies

·          Plan to undertake conflict resolution and peace building practice

 

STAFF PROFILE
Profile of CCGS Staff
Fidelis Allen has been teaching at the University of Port Harcourt since 2005 . He was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor  of Political Science (Development) in 2013.  His research focus covers  natural resource conflict in the  Niger Delta, Nigeria and Africa. He has conducted research in Nigeria,  Tanzania, Uganda, Ghana,  and South Africa.. Allen was Postdoctoral Scholar at the Centre for Civil Society, University of KwaZulu-Natal Howaard College, South Africa where he studied environmental social movement organizations and conflict.  ,He has published widely in local and international journals.  His article on Social Moments appeared in the heroic Encyclopedia of Political Science, published by the American International Political Science Association.  He is the author of Implementation of Oil Related Environmental Policies in Nigeria: Government Inertia and Conflict in the Niger Delta, published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing in the United Kingdom.  Allen is the Director of the Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies, at the University of Port Harcourt.   In his days as doctoral student at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, he won  Canada’s International Development Research Centre and United Nations University for Peace Africa ’program's  prestigious  Doctoral Awards to conduct his research in oil related environmental  policy and conflict  in the Niger Delta.   He is  Editor –in-Chief African Conflicts Profile, a journal published by CCGS.

Onyinyechukwu Onyido is a lecturer at the Centre for  Conflict and Gender Studies. She holds a Masters and a PhD  degree in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of Ibadan.  She has published articles  in national and international journals. She is currently  Managing Editor of the Centre’s Journal, African Conflict Profile and the Monograph Series. Her research interests include Post Conflict States; Sexual Violence during and after Armed Conflict; Gender and Peacebuilding/Post Conflict Reconstruction; and Conflict Prevention and transformation.

Paul Nyulaku Lectures at the Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies, University of Port-Harcourt, Nigeria and Co-ordinates Professional Development Programme  unit of the Centre. Prior to taking up this position in January, 2008, he  served as Community Development Officer (Operations) with the award winning Community Social Development Project (CSDP Benue Project Office) of the World Bank Nigeria.  This  was a pioneer program, initiated and being successfully executed under  the World Bank’s Community Driven Development Strategy (CDD) in partnership with the three tiers of Government. Paul holds a Master of Arts (M.A) Degree in Peace and Conflict Studies and a Bachelors degree in Political Science. His  research interests include  Disarmament Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR), Post Conflict Peace Building and Reconstruction and Peace Policy Development and Advocacy. He has attended and facilitated International Professional Courses in Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) Techniques, Writing Grant Research Proposals, Disarmament Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR), Advanced Reintegration, Collaborative Problem Based Learning (CPBL) and Policy Engagement and Advocacy among others and is a consultant to NGO’s and several International Organizations.

Gbenemene Kpae is a Lecturer at the Centre . He holds a Masters Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Missouri, St. Louis, United States of America. Gbenemene is a Doctor of Philosophy candidate in the Department of Sociology, University of Port Harcourt. His research interests include Crime and Conflict; Unemployment and Armed Robbery; and Crime and Community Policing.

Charles Mezie-Okoye lectures at the Centre on contract. . He holds a Masters in Sociology of Development and is currently a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Port Harcourt with focus on Traditional Mechanisms for Managing Conflicts in Africa. United States Institute of Peace (USIP) in Conflict Analysis has certified Charles.

Academic programs

The Centre has two main programmes at Master and Post  Graduate Diploma levels: Peace and Conflict and Gender Studies.

Rationale/Justification

Growing cases of violent conflict across the world are grave enough to have warranted concern by scholars, politicians, policy makers and civil society. Peace is not the absence of violence.   The embededness of violent conflict in the character of existing social, economic and political systems calls for systematic analyses of the underlying issues. It means issues such as justice and inequality have to be seen as products of structures of society which are in turn capable of triggering violent conflicts directly or indirectly.  The risk of political, economic, gender and social violence has remained high in many societies including Nigeria.  Understanding the causes of these conflicts then and the ways to address them is an important component of any aspiration for development, and which systematic studies from a trans-disciplinary background can always offer.  All too often, however,  the underlying causes of conflicts are complex. Specialized knowledge or skill is required to be able to understand the nature of conflicts, as this has to inform the basis for resolving or managing them.

 

Admittedly, the consequences of violent conflict are undesirable; as they do not only destabilize human society but also make it difficult to sustain whatever progress it may have recorded in the past.  New and lingering violent conflicts in Nigeria and other parts of the world have proved that the burden of explaining and designing solutions to these crises is not what policy makers alone can achieve without universities and research centres having a say.  These problems actually define the very essence of the development of Peace and Conflict and Gender Studies fields from a trans-disciplinary background.

 

Finally, stakeholders in conflict management, resolution and peacebuilding require skills, not only to mitigate impacts, but also to help in the formulation of effective strategies for resolving intractable conflicts. Quality graduate training then is required to achieve this objective.

 

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies, with the MSc, MA, and PGD certificates in either Peace or Conflict or Gender Studies can seek career in the areas of research and development.  They can seek opportunities with government ministries and agencies. They can equally seek higher degrees at the level of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) to enable them qualify as university teachers in the fields or related academic departments.  The Peace and Conflict Studies and Gender Studies fields are evolving very fast with huge opportunities for those actively involved in development work.  Peace and Gender Education, now being handled at different levels of society, is an area in which graduates of the fields can apply their skills within the non-governmental, inter-governmental and governmental sectors in the effort by many stakeholder groups to tackle the problem of growing culture of violence.  The Centre is already considering submission of proposals to the Graduate School for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gender Studies, and will be doing so shortly in Peace and Conflict field as well.

 

2.0       Objectives of the Post Graduate Programme

The overall goal of the programme is to provide quality graduate level training and research to enable our students analyse conflicts so as to understand the underlying causes and to apply appropriate strategies to manage or resolve them. The specific objectives of the programme are:

  • To provide high-grade postgraduate programmes at Postgraduate Diploma Level.
  • To give students theoretical, methodological and practical grounding in the emerging field of peace and conflict studies.
  • To equip students with the necessary skills in order for them to be able to undertake research-based (knowledge-driven) advocacy on gender equality and woman empowerment.
  • To conduct research on the causes of intra-state and international armed conflict,  security, conflict resolution and post-conflict building with special reference to Africa.
  • To engage in practical projects that build capabilities for sustainable development, community engagement, governance and conflict transformation
  • To give those people with interest in the field, but whose initial training was not in peace and conflict studies, an opportunity to achieve there desired goal.

 

2.03     Eligibility

To be eligible for admission into the programme, candidates must possess a first degree (B.Sc. B.Ed., B.A.) from any recognized university. Preference will however be given to candidates who have degrees in related fields of study, and to those who work in the peace and conflict sector. In exceptional cases, candidates without first degrees, but who have attended high professional institutions and who have demonstrable practical experience in peacekeeping operations and other peacebuilding activities, may be considered for admission.

 

2.04     Duration

The Post-Graduate Diploma (PGD) in Peace and Conflict Studies is designed to run for 12 calendar months minimum and 24 calendar months maximum in modules.

 

2.05     Method of Teaching

Delivery of course contents is designed through lectures, group work, case studies, critical reading, discussion, circles and self assessment and so on. There are teaching aids, including audio-visual materials to facilitate learning.

 

2.06     Method of Assessment

Students are expected to write a two-hour closed book examination at the end of every course taken. Examination questions are written so as to test for understanding and critical evaluation, as is stated in the learning outcomes. A written term paper and tests shall be part of a Continuous Assessment (CA).

 

2.07     Course Requirements

To graduate from the Diploma programme, a candidate must obtain a minimum of 30 credit units. This load will include a research project that carries 6 credit units,  o be completed after the course work. In addition to the Core Courses, students are required to take at least 2 elective courses per semester.

 

 

 

First Semester

S/No

Course

Code

Course Title

Credit

Unit

1.

PCS 700.1

Concepts and Theories of Peace and Conflict Studies

3

2.

PCS 701.1

African Approaches to Conflict Resolution

2

3.

PCS 702.1

Conflict Analyses and Management

2

4.

PCS 703.1

Non-Violent Conflict Transformation

2

5.

PCS 706.1

Research Methodology in Peace Studies

3

6.

PCS 709.1

Crime and Armed Conflict  (E)

2

7.

PCS 710.1

Communications and Conflict Management  (E)

2

8.

PCS 711.1

Peace-Making and International Peacekeeping  (E)

3

 

19

Total

Second Semester

S/No

Course

Code

Course Title

Credit

Unit

1.

PCS 704.2

Peacebuilding Strategies and Recovery Frameworks

3

2.

PCS 705.2

Environment and Conflict

2

3.

PCS 708.2

Dissertation: Write, Submit and Defend

6

4.

PCS 712.2

Humanitarian Intervention and Complex Emergencies  (E)

2

5.

PCS 713.2

Gender, Conflict and Peacebuilding

2

6.

PCS 714.2

Peace Education and Peer Mediation  (E)

2

7.

PCS 715.2

Economics of Peace and Conflict  (E)

2

 

19

Total

 

 

2.10      Assessment of Students

            Students will be assessed on the courses taken as follows:

  1. Continuous Assessment  = 40%
  2. End of semester written examination = 60%. Candidates are expected to obtain a minimum grade of ‘C’ (50%) in each course they registered for and a seminar in order to qualify for the award of the Post-Graduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies.

Grading Guide

A         =         70%  - 100%

B          =         60%  -  69%

C          =         50%  -  59%

F          =         0%  -  49%

 

3.0       DIPLOMA CLASSIFICATION

Students in the PGD  programme  in Peace and Conflict will be awarded with Upper Credit, Lower Credit and a Pass. The cumulative grade point for classification shall be:

            Class of Diploma        CGPA

            Distinction                  4.50 – 5.00

            Upper Credit    4.00 – 4.49

            Lower Credit   3.50 – 3.99

            Merit                            3.00 – 3.49

            Fail                              1.00 – 2.99

 

3.01      DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

PCS 700.1       Concepts and Theories of Peace and Conflict Studies (core) – 2 Credits

This course is intended to equip students with the knowledge of evolution and development of Peace and Conflict Studies as an academic field of study.  It explores the nature of the field and its present status. In addition, it aims at equipping students with basic concepts in the field, such as conflict, violence, conflict management, conflict resolution, containment etc.  It explores theories of peace and conflict, focusing on Western and African perspectives with a view to discovering gaps in explanations to issues of peace and conflict.

 

PCS 701.1        African Approaches to Conflict Resolution (Core) – 2 Credits

This course explores African approaches to conflict resolution. It explores African traditional mechanisms for conflict resolution, principles and processes of Alternative Dispute Resolution in in the context of community and state in Africa.  Case studies from Nigeria, West Africa and the rest of Africa are explored with a view to comparing western approaches to conflict resolution.

 

PCS 702.1       Conflict Analyses (Core) – 2 Credits

This course is intended to equip students with adequate skills for conflict analyses. This derives from the narrative of theory of change that accords conflict analyses a prerequisite for practical intervention in conflicts and policy formulation. It will explore methods of conflict analyses, the ABC; pyramid methods, case study and mapping of conflict.

 

PCS 703.1       Non-violent Conflict Transformation (Core) – 2 Credits

This course is designed to equip students with the theories and principles of nonviolent conflict transformation.  The growing culture of violence in politics and inter-personal relations requires peace education that includes knowledge and application of methods of nonviolence.  Some people or individuals in conflict tend to have a penchant for attack of life and limbs of opponents rather their power. This alone underlies a need to provide students with an opportunity to explore the concept of nonviolence and related concepts of non-killing in dealing with conflicts. The course is intended to make students appreciate the values, methods and strategies of nonviolent conflict transformation by focusing on specific cases, including recent nonviolent actions in Africa. As well, it will look at historical cases of nonviolent struggles and ideas credited to Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Junior. The course also explore traditional approaches to peace in Africa in context of nonviolence.

 

PCS 704.2       Peacebuilding Strategies and Recovery Frameworks (Core) – 2 Credits

Students will be introduced to issues of causes of conflict and peacebuilding approaches. The course will examine diverse frameworks for dealing with the problem of conflict, developed by local, national, regional and international organizations. There are different regional and international frameworks that have been developed to address the problem of conflict, which students need to be familiar with. They also need to be aware of barriers to sustainable peace and ways of preventing them. Finally, the course will expose students to crosscutting issues like human security approach to development, sustainable development, participatory development and development co-operation.

 

PCS 705.2 Environments and Conflict (Core) – 2 Credits

Students will understand the origin and nature of conflicts caused by environmental degradation in Africa, particularly in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. It will examine the nature of environmental conflict on country-by-country or region-by-region basis, especially in Africa where climate change is increasingly affecting pastoralists.  In addition, the course will explore the impact of natural resource extraction and the impact of environmental regimes (legislations, treaties and protocols) on environment and conflict.

PCS 706.1       Research Methodology in Peace Studies (Core) – 2 Credits

This course is aimed at introducing students to peace and conflict research. Topics to be covered include epistemological foundations—research philosophical traditions (qualitative and quantitative research); conceptual foundations—meaning research, types of research; the role of theory in research, meaning and ways of formulating hypotheses and types of research etc. Other topics include, types of peace and conflict research, gender sensitivity in peace and conflict research, research planning and implementation, research design, instruments of data collection; data analyses and methods; sampling techniques; types and principles of bibliographical citations, research process and writing up of reports. Etc.

 

PCS 708.2       Research Project (Core) – 6 Credits

Every student will write, defend and submit a research project at the end of the course work, leading to the Submission of a dissertation. The topic of research must fall within one of the research areas in peace and conflict studies.

 

PCS 709.1 Crimes and Armed Conflict (Elective) – 2 Credits

Understanding the nature of crime in relation to armed conflict is the core mandate of this course.  It seeks to introduce students to the knowledge of how criminal activities fuel conflict and vice versa.  It will pay special attention to the nature armed violence and the role of criminal activities. It explores the character of criminal violence, in developing countries, especially in Nigeria and how it fits with or contributes to armed conflict within or across the border.  Political, intra and inter-community conflicts have degenerated into criminal violence with kidnapping, rape, assassination, armed robbery, gun violence and so on as key elements.  

 

PCS 710.1        Communications and Conflict Management (Elective) – 2 Credits

This course explores the role of the media in the management of conflict. Specifically it looks at meaning, skills, techniques, language, and the importance of communication in conflict management. It further examines theories of communication in relation to the role of the media as an instrument of mass communication, as it also explores attitudes and communication skills in conflict situations. It will also involve ethics of reporting conflict, news objectivity in conflict reporting; use of language switch and mannerism in conflict reporting; risks in conflict coverage and reporting; conflict of interest between media proprietors and the ethics in conflict coverage.

 

PCS 711.1 Peacemaking and International Peace-Keeping (Elective) – 2 Credits

This course will explore the concept of peacemaking and peacekeeping and examine specific cases with regional and global multilateral efforts at the level of ECOWAS and the UN. It will explore the role of International Law in managing conflicts from the perspectives of “Responsibility to protect”.

 

PCS 712.2 Humanitarian Intervention and Complex Emergencies (Elective) – 2 Credits

This course is aimed at exposing students to issues of humanitarian intervention and needs generated by complex emergencies. It examines intervention theory in relation to the international principle of non-interference. Provision of humanitarian service to refugees, in contexts of human and natural disasters, international moral responsibility, management of refugees’ welfare, Internally Displaced Persons, within and outside the Nigerian society are issues to be looked at. In addition, the course will look at security risks associated with humanitarian services, determining complex emergencies and the form of intervention required in such cases.

 

PCS 713.2 Gender and Peacebuilding (Required) – 2 Credits

Peacebuilding involves a set of values, skills, analytical tools and processes to create sustainable, just, and peaceful communities.  Gender and Peace and Conflict studies straddle each other. This course will explore the role of gender in peacebuilding.  Already, men and women in every society are engaged in building peace.  However their tasks, which depend on the environments and a number of intervening variables and experience are all too often different. This course will examine the relevance of gender perspectives in peacebuilding processes. It will also discuss and analyze frameworks concerning the inclusion of women in peacebuilding   processes e.g. United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.

 

PCS 714.2 Peace Education and Peer Mediation – 2 Credits

Peace education is crucial for tackling the problem of violent conflict in the world. Peace educators and peer groups are expected to carry out this responsibility in a most professional way.  This course will explore the concept of peace education, approaches and direction.  It will expose students to the values, skills, attitudes, and behaviours necessary for people to be able to live harmoniously with one another and with nature as well.  In addition, the course will examine forms of peer mediation, including school and community-based peer mediation programmes and their effectiveness in addressing conflict.

 

 

 

PCS 715.2 Economics of Peace and Conflict – 2 Credits

This course explores the political economy of conflict. It seeks to explain the economics of peace and conflict in Africa, particularly in Nigeria. It examines the impact of ethno-religious conflict, environmental conflicts and inter-communal conflicts on peoples’ livelihood. Students shall examine the cost/benefit analyses of war, disruption of local and national economies, resource exploitation and management, social dislocations, and the costs of peacekeeping, peacebuilding, reconstruction and rehabilitation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M.Sc DEGREE IN PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES

 

1.01      Aim and Objectives

  1. The overall goal of the programme is to provide quality graduate level training and research to enable our students analyse conflicts so as to understand the underlying causes and to apply appropriate strategies to manage or resolve them. The specific objectives of the programme are: To generate and transfer knowledge in conflict and peace dynamics through research and teaching including professional workshops
  2. To deliver high-quality postgraduate programmes at Masters’ level.
  3. To give students theoretical, methodological and practical grounding in the emerging field of peace and conflict studies.
  4. To conduct research on the causes of intra-state and international armed conflict,  security, conflict resolution and post-conflict peace building with special reference to Africa.
  5. To engage in practical projects that build local capacities for sustainable development, community engagement, governance and conflict transformation.  

 

2.01      REGULATIONS GOVERNING AWARD OF MSC DEGREE

In addition to the admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, the following regulations shall govern the award of the MSc in Peace and Conflict studies:

  1. Candidates for admission into the programme shall possess an appropriate Bachelor’s degree of the University of Port Harcourt or any other recognized university. Preference shall be given to candidates doing related jobs in Government Ministries, the Private sector, and Security services,  
  2. The maximum period allowed for the completion of the MSc degree both for full-time and part-time students shall be 18 and 36 months respectively (or an equivalent period, pro-rata, for a combination of part-time and full-time registration),
  3. Students may register for a maximum of 45 units, but assessment for the award of the degree is based on the attainment of 39 units.
  4. The part-time student shall be required to register for a minimum of 15 units in any one year.
  5. The MSc Peace and Conflict Studies degree shall be classified in line with the existing regulations of the School of Graduate Studies (SGS).

 

2.02 Admission Requirements

Candidates for the Master of Science degree in Peace and Conflict Studies must have one of the following:

  1. A good first degree honours in any discipline with a minimum of second-class lower division with a CGPA of 3.00 in a five-point scale.
  2. A minimum of third class honours degree from a recognized university plus Postgraduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies at credit level with a CGPA of 3.50.
  3. Credit in HND with Postgraduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies in a recognized university with a CGPA of 3.50.
  4. Evidence of NYSC discharge or exemption/exclusion certificate is required.

 

2.03 Duration of Programme

  1. The Full-time MSc degree in Peace and Conflict Studies shall run for a maximum of 24 calendar months.
  2. The Part-time programme shall run for a minimum of 24 calendar months and maximum of 36 calendar months.

 

2.04 Requirements for Graduation

To qualify for the award of an MSc degree in Peace and Conflict Studies, a candidate must pass a minimum of 37 credit units comprising core, elective and seminars courses and the Dissertation.                                                                       

              2.05           Mode of Application

  1. Requests for application forms should be made to the Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies of the University.  Such requests must be accompanied by the stipulated fee made payable to the Centre with the candidate’s name, address and course applied for, written at the reverse side.

 

 

1ST SEMSESTER

S/No

Course

Code

Course Title

(Core Courses)

Credit Unit

1.

CGS 801.1

ICT and Research Method

2

2.

PCS 800.1

Concepts and Theories of Peace and Conflict Studies

3

3.

PCS 801.1

Research Methodology in Peace Studies

3

4.

PCS 805.1

Environmental Conflict

3

5.

PCS 803.1

African Approaches to Conflict Management and Resolution

3

 

 

(Elective Courses) Choose one)

 

6.

PCS 804.1

Crime and Armed Conflict

3

7.

PCS 806.1

Peace-making and International Peace-keeping

3

8.

PCS 802.1

Language, Communication and Conflict Management

3

 

17

           

2TH SEMESTER

 

S/No

Course

Code

Course Title

(Core Courses)

Credit Unit

1.

CGS 802.2

Entrepreneurship and Management

2

2.

PCS 811.2

Advanced Seminar on Ethnic Conflicts and Violence

3

3.

PCS 812.2

Advanced Seminar in Environment and Globalization

3

4.

PCS 813.2

Advanced Seminar in Conflict Bargaining and International Relations.

3

5.

PCS 808.2

M.Sc Thesis

6

 

 

(Elective Courses) – Choose one

 

6.

PCS 807.2

Religions, Peace and Conflict

3

7.

PCS 809.2

Gender, Conflict and Peacebuilding

3

8.

PCS 810.2

Peace Education and Peer Mediation

3

 

 

                          Total                            =

20

 

3.00     COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

PCS 800.1 Concepts and Theories in Peace and Conflict

This course is intended to expose students to basic concepts and theories in Peace and Conflict Studies.  It is designed to introduce them to the nature, history and state of the field. Specific concepts and theories to be explored include: conflict; peace; violence; peacebuilding; mediation; alternative dispute resolution, conflict management; conflict resolution; conflict transformation; peacekeeping; terrorism and non-violence.

 

CGS 801.1: ICT and research methodology (2 Credit Units)

This course should cover essentials of spreadsheets, Internet technology, Statistical Packages, Precision and Accuracy of Estimates, Principles of Scientific Research, Concepts of Hypotheses, Formulation and Testing, Organization of Research and Report Writing.

 

PCS 801.1 Research Methodology

Peace and Conflict research is trans-disciplinary, drawing from diverse fields of study. This course aims at equipping students with the concepts and skills required for effective peace and conflict research. Covering several topics, we seek to prepare students for research project writing, which is a key component of programme.  Broad topics to be covered include: epistemological foundation; conceptual foundation; typologies of research; research planning and implementation; measurement; surveys and sampling techniques; instruments for data collection; methods of data presentation and analyses; and principles of bibliographical citations.

 

PCS 802.1 Languages, Communication and Conflict Management

This course examines the nexus between language, communication and conflict. Using case studies, it explores how language usage and differences, stereotypes, perception, verbal as well as non-verbal aspects of communication impact social relationships and how these can be improved in potential and actual contexts through the mastery of conflict-sensitive communication.

 

PCS 803.1 African Approaches to Conflict Management and resolution

This course is aimed at exposing students to issues of traditional approaches to conflict management and resolution.   It will look at the nature of conflict, management and resolution in Africa—from pre-colonial through colonial to the postcolonial era in Africa, principles and processes of Alternate Dispute Resolution and Traditional Dispute Resolution mechanisms (culture and the role of traditional rulers). In addition, it will explore nonviolence and peacebuilding in Africa. Selected cases in Africa, including Nigeria will be explored.

 

PCS 804.1 Crimes and Armed Conflict

This course is intended to equip students with conceptual issues in international and non-international armed conflict and crime.  It explores the nature of such conflicts in relation to crime in the eyes of international humanitarian law.  It explores the relationship between criminal activities such as illicit trade in arms and drugs and armed conflict.  In addition it contextually introduces students to the nature crime against humanity in armed conflicts in humanitarian law and from there looks at character of international regimes (e.g. Geneva Convention of 1949 and 1977 for regulating crimes in international and non-international armed conflicts respectively) for regulating crime in armed conflicts in relation to specific cases in Africa and beyond.

 

PCS 805.1 Environmental Conflict

This course will explore the concept and theories of environmental conflict.  The course is aimed at enabling students to appreciate the nature of environmental problems and how they generate conflict. It address specific cases in Africa and other parts of the world regarding nature of environmental problems and impact on livelihood, and how these cause conflicts.   The Niger Delta, where the production of oil and gas has generated issues between communities, security and oil companies will be explored along with cases in Sudan, Somalia etc. It will look at the origin and nature of conflicts caused by environmental degradation in Africa.   Climate change and conflict at the local, national and international levels will also be explored. In addition, the course will examine the impact of war on the environments and explore nature at global and national environmental regimes enacted to protect the environments.

 

PCS 806.1 Peacemaking and International Peacekeeping

This course is intended to expose students to the concepts and nature of peacemaking and international peacekeeping by exploring regional and global efforts at managing conflicts in the context of international law and United Nations Security Council mandates.  It seeks to equip students with the skills for analysing and understanding of challenges of peacemaking and international peacekeeping.  The topic of Responsibility to Protect will be explored.  This course will enable students to appreciate the role of the UN, ECOWAS, NGOs and gender in peacemaking and peacekeeping.

 

CGS 802.2      Management and Entrepreneurship (2 Credit Units)

This course will cover business environment, general management, financial management, entrepreneurship development, feasibility studies, marketing and managerial problem solving.

 

PCS 807.2 Religion, Peace and Conflict

This course will examine faith-based conflicts. It will examine the role of religion either in fuelling or resolving conflicts.  It will focus on selected cases at the local, national and international fronts.  Specific attention will be paid to the Nigerian case, with regard to issues such as Sharia, religious riots in parts of the country, separatist struggles and government efforts at resolving the conflicts.

 

PCS 808.2  M.Sc. Dissertation        

The M.Sc Thesis should be an original work presented in accordance with the regulations of the Graduate School. It shall be accepted and deemed necessary to have contributed to knowledge.

 

PCS 809.2 Gender, Conflict and Peacebuilding

Gender as a key element in peacebuilding will be explored in this course.  Peacebuilding includes a set of values, relational skills, analytical tools and processes to create sustainable, just, and peaceful communities. Men and women in every community are already engaged in building peace, but their tasks and experiences are almost always different. Therefore this course will highlight the relevance of using a gender perspective in all phases of peace building, from the negotiation table, through the drawing of the mandate of the peace support mission, to its implementation on the ground. It will also discuss and analyse frameworks concerning the inclusion of women in peace process e.g. United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.    

 

PCS 810.2 Peace Education and Peer Mediation

This course will examine the concepts of peace education, peer mediation, culture of peace, and institutions and processes of peace education.  It will also identify key agencies or institutions involved in peace education and results. It will then look at teaching or training in non-violence, using subjects like music, art, drama, mathematics. The nature of peer mediation, types, approaches, programmes and impact will be explored.

 

PCS 811.2 Advanced Seminar on Ethnic Conflicts and Violence

This course covers ethical and philosophical issues in peaceful co-existence, conflict and violence driven by ethnic identity and agitations across the ages. It addresses, in addition, the impact of ethnic identity and nationalism on political choices that they make, and discusses the theories that have been used to explain motivations and actions of ethnic groups in economic as well as socio-political contexts.           

 

PCS 812.2 Advanced Seminar in Environment and Globalization

This course examines the conflicts taking place in various parts of the world including sub-Saharan Africa. These conflicts include the ones in Iraq, Syria, Ukraine, South Sudan, Somalia, Afghanistan, Columbia in relation to globalization.  Attention shall be paid to the methods employed by mediating parties (for example, United Nations, A.U, E.U. ECOWAS) to bring disputing parties to a bargaining table. In addition, each student will be expected to write a seminar paper and present in class  on a conflict that has attracted global attention. It will explore the role of globalisation in environmentally induced conflicts in different parts of the world.

 

PCS 813.2 Advanced Seminar in Environment and Globalization.

This course exposes students to the various issues relating to the environment, especially environment protection and preservation. It will also examine the role of environmental groups and NGOs to ensure that big corporations reduce greenhouse emission significantly. The course shall highlight the difficulties and challenges faced by poor and developing countries in ensuring that advanced countries enforce Laws against environmental pollution due to greenhouse emission.

 

3.01 LECTURERS AND PARTNERS

Resource persons/lecturers are drawn from a wide range of disciplines, including Political Science, Economics, Humanities, Sociology, Education, Theatre Arts and so on.  In addition, it draws expertise and occasional guest lecturers from the Peace and Conflict Studies Centres within and outside Nigeria.

 

POST-GRADUATE DIPLOMA (PGD) IN GENDER STUDIES

  1. Qualification for Admission:

To qualify for admission into the Post-Graduate Diploma programme, a candidate must possess a third class (3rd) degree or equivalent level with a CGPA of 1.5 points on 5-point scale of the University of Port Harcourt in any field. For HND background, lower credit pass shall be considered

 

  1. Duration:

The Post-Graduate Diploma programme in Gender and Women Development Studies runs full time for twelve (12) calendar months, being the minimum duration and 24 months maximum.

 

  1. Requirements:

A candidate is required to offer nine (9) taught courses which shall lay emphasis on gender and women development issues. In addition, one seminar paper is to be presented by every candidate before graduation. On successful completion of the programme, each candidate is awarded a PGD Certificate in Gender and Women Development Studies.

 

Course Code and Title

First Semester

GDS 701.1 Introduction to Gender

and Development Studies                         3

GDS 702.1 Gender, Culture and Society  3

GDS 703.1 Man and Masculinity

versus Female and Feminity                                  3

GDS 704.1 Gender, Arts and Science       3

GDS 705.1 Gender and Religion               3

TOTAL                                                                15

 

SECOND SEMESTER

GDS 706.2 Gender, Education

and Politics                                                            3

GDS 707.2 Gender Relations in

Selected Organizations                                          3

GDS 708.2 Women in Development                    3

GDS 709.2 Introduction to

Research Methods                                     3

GDS 710.2 Research Seminar                               3

TOTAL                                                                15

Course Descriptions

 

GDS 701.1 Introduction to Gender and Development Studies

Introducon to Gender and Development Studies

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the relaonship between gender and development.

It will help the students develop a greater understanding of the nature and importance of gender roles

and relaons in development processes. The course will provide a background on current gender and

development approaches. It will also explore how gender is a development issue and will develop the

students’ knowledge and understanding of gender analysis and its applicaon in development pracce,

using a range of gender analysis frameworks and tools

Introducon to Gender and Development Studies

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the relaonship between gender and development.

It will help the students develop a greater understanding of the nature and importance of gender roles

and relaons in development processes. The course will provide a background on current gender and

development approaches. It will also explore how gender is a development issue and will develop the

students’ knowledge and understanding of gender analysis and its applicaon in development pracce,

using a range of gender analysis frameworks and tools

Introducon to Gender and Development Studies

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the relaonship between gender and development.

It will help the students develop a greater understanding of the nature and importance of gender roles

and relaons in development processes. The course will provide a background on current gender and

development approaches. It will also explore how gender is a development issue and will develop the

students’ knowledge and understanding of gender analysis and its applicaon in development pracce,

using a range of gender analysis frameworks and tools

Introducon to Gender and Development Studies

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the relaonship between gender and development.

It will help the students develop a greater understanding of the nature and importance of gender roles

and relaons in development processes. The course will provide a background on current gender and

development approaches. It will also explore how gender is a development issue and will develop the

students’ knowledge and understanding of gender analysis and its applicaon in development pracce,

using a range of gender analysis frameworks and tools

Introducon to Gender and Development Studies

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the relaonship between gender and development.

It will help the students develop a greater understanding of the nature and importance of gender roles

and relaons in development processes. The course will provide a background on current gender and

development approaches. It will also explore how gender is a development issue and will develop the

students’ knowledge and understanding of gender analysis and its applicaon in development pracce,

using a range of gender analysis frameworks and tools

This course is intended to introduce students to basic concepts in gender and development studies.  The course will look at the link between gender and development. In addition, it will address gendered development approaches and perspectives.

 

GDS 702.1 Gender, Culture and Society

Gender, culture and society are key concepts to be examined in in this course.   Culture plays a crucial role in understanding how the role of men and women are defined in society.  Specific cases in Nigeria and Africa will be explored.

 

GDS 703.1 Man and Masculinity versus Female and Feminity

Issues of role expectations between males and females will be examined.  The course will explore questions of masculinity and feminity in different societal/cultural settings. How does society see the role/responsibility of men and women in society? How does it affect individual perspectives, behaviour and attitude? The course is intended among others, to address these questions.

 

GDS 704.1 Gender, Arts and Science

The course adopts a historical approach to explore the involvement of male and female in the arts and science. Different religious tenets on gender and development issues will be introduced as well as their relationship with the choice of career. Biological theories of gender will be compared with the religious tenets. On the other hand, gender and development issues in this era of science and technology are considered. The socio-cultural influence on the choice of career for both male and female in these areas are equally examined.

 

GDS 705.1 Gender and Religion

Different religious tenets on gender and development issues will be introduced as well as their relationships with the choice of career. Biological theories of gender will be compared with religious tenets.


GDS 706.2  Gender, Education and Politics

The course examines feminist theories in relation to male and female participation in education and politics. Critical analyses of both legal and legislative demands of women in both developed and developing countries will be considered.

 

GDS 707.2 Gender Relations in Selected Organisations

This course focuses on a study of different social relationships among and between males and females in different organisations. Such areas include job position/responsibility, promotions, violence and the likes. This provides an opportunity to observe and reflect on the already acquired knowledge.

 

GDS 708.2 Women in Development

Women’s role expectations in traditional and modern periods are compared. Particularly, attention is given to role expectations of women in the globalizing world. Discussions include recent policies that focus on women development in the New Millennium. Responses from different developing countries, especially in Africa, are compared in order to identify possible obstacles and propose the way forward.

GDS 709.2   Introduction to Research Methods

Areas to be covered include an introduction to the principles of research in gender and women development studies, bearing in mind the multi-disciplinary nature; design of research instrument; empirical studies design as well as the qualitative and quantitative methods of analyses, bearing in mind the different approaches for project writing.

 

GDS 710.2  Research Seminar

Independent topics in different areas of interest are to be researched and presented as seminar series. However, chosen topics shall be supervised to be in line with the area of specialization of each candidate.

 

MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) IN GENDER STUDIES

  1. Qualification for Admission:

The qualification for admission into the Master of Arts programme will be considered as follows:

  • A candidate must possess at least a Second Class Lower Division (22) in Gender and Women Development Studies or a degree in Social Sciences/Humanities/Education from any recognized Tertiary Institution, with a CGPA of 3.00 on 5-point scale of the University of Port Harcourt.
  • A candidate must possess the University of Port Post-Graduate Diploma in Gender and Women Development Studies, with a minimum grade of merit.

 

  1. Duration:

The Master’s Degree Programme in Gender and Women Development Studies shall run full time for one-year minimum duration and two years maximum. On the other hand, the Part-time will run for two years minimum duration and four years maximum duration.

 

  1. Requirements:

For the Master’s Degree programme, a candidate is required to offer eight (8) taught courses, including Seminar and Thesis, all of which shall focus on gender and women development issues. On successful completion, each candidate is awarded a Master of Arts Degree in Gender & Women Development Studies.

 

Course Code and Title

First Semester

GDS 801.1   Feminist Theories                                         3

GDS 802.1Gender and Theories of Development                      3

GDS 803.1  Race and Culture in Africa                            3

GDS 804.1  Gender and Globalization                             3

GDS 805.1  The Role of NGOs and International

Organisations in Gender and Development                                  3

 

Second Semester

Electives (any two courses):                                                      6

GDS 806.2  Gender Issues in Literature                           3

GDS 807.2  Gender Issues in Music and Dance               3

GDS 808.2  Gender Issues in Films and Media                3

GDS 809.2  Gender Issues in Education                          3

GDS 810.2  Gender Issues in Health                                            3

GDS 811.2  Gender Issues in Management                                  3

GDS 812.2  Research Methods                                                     3

GDS 813.2 Research Seminar                                                       3

GDS 814.2  Supervised Thesis                                                      3

TOTAL                                                                                        18

 

Course Descriptions

GDS 801.2: Feminist Theories

The course explores information on contemporary feminist debate as presented in Structuralism, Marxism and Socio-cultural studies, to mention a few. The main objective is to analyze unequal conditions of male and female population in society. It provides an opportunity to critical issues such as sexuality, values and identity. The Nigerian context of feminist theory is equally discussed.

 

GDS 802.2   Gender and Theories of Development

Different perspectives of gender as an interdisciplinary concept and their applications in different fields are examined. Equally, the course examines critically both classical and contemporary theories of development in relation to gender in order to identify and discuss their implications for effective policy planning and implementation for achieving development in Nigeria.

 

GDS 803.2  Race and Culture in Africa

Topics should concentrate on contemporary issues in different parts of Africa to be able to compare and contrast different experiences of gender and development issues with local experiences such as anatomy and control, equality of educational opportunity, stratification and employment opportunity, gender and occupational choice, etc.

 

GDS 804.2  Gender and Globalization

The concept of globalization is examined. The course introduces gender issues in development, particularly with reference to developing areas where poverty, high illiteracy rate, unemployment, underemployment and early retirement appear to be common, yet the effort is to achieve partnership between and among nations. In addition, both feminist and queer theories are considered as issues of nationality, ethnicity, race and sexuality are discussed in the effort to identify a universal ground to effectively accommodate male and female population in the globalized world.

 

GDS 805.2: The Role of NGOs and International Organizations in Gender and Development Issues

This course examines the contributions of International organizations such as UNDP, World Bank, UNESCO, UNICEF as well as NGOs in different parts of Africa and Nigeria in particular. Local examples include the Association of Female Lawyers, National Council for Women Society, Men’s Christian Association, Women in Nigeria, etc.

 

Electives (Any Two)

GDS 806.2  Gender Issues in Literature                          

GDS 807.2  Gender Issues in Music and Dance              

GDS 808.2  Gender Issues in Films and Media               

GDS 809.2  Gender Issues in Education                         

GDS 810.2  Gender Issues in Health                                           

GDS 811.2  Gender Issues in Management

 

In each of the selected areas, different presentations of masculinity and feminity, with regard to mainstreaming, role expectations, expected code of conduct, language, dressing and sexuality in a changing socio-economic condition. Different avenues through which socio change could be achieved in each area are equally examined.

 

GDS 812.2   Research Methods

Areas to be covered include principles of research with particular reference to gender and women development studies, bearing in mind the multi-disciplinary nature of the programme; design of research instrument; empirical studies design; qualitative and quantitative methods of analyses and different approaches for project writing.

 

GDS 813.2    Research Seminar

Independent topics in different areas of interest are to be researched and presented as seminar series. However, chosen topics shall be supervised to be in line with the area of specialization of each candidate.

 

GDS 814.2   Supervised Dissertation

A candidate’s choice of research project topic must be related to his/her area of specialization.

 

RULES AND REGULATIONS

  • All University rules and regulations must be obeyed.
  • Students must respect staff statutory rights.
  • Students must respect academic instructions by lecturers.
  • Involvement in cultism is prohibited.
  • Must avoid acts capable of tarnishing the image of the University.
  • Participation in class activities is compulsory.
  • Students must register for all courses and attend not fewer than 75% of lectures to qualify for written examinations.


CONSULTANCY FOCUS AREAS
— Training Plan Development
— Grant Proposal Writing
— Conflict Prevention and Peace building
— Policy Advocacy and Engagement
— Effective Workshop Facilitation/Knowledge Transfer
— Strategy and Institutional Development
— Project Design and Evaluation
— Environmental Conflict Analysis (A component of Environmental Impact Assessment)
— Human Resources and Leadership Development
— Participatory Learning and Action (P.L.A) and design of Community Development plans

 

PROJECTS
Completed and Ongoing Projects
— 2005:The Ogoni Research Project, sponsored by Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution (IPCR), Presidency, Abuja
— 2006:The Niger Delta Peace and Security Strategy Job Creation Project (PaSS)
— 2007: The film for Peace Project an Initiative of Common Ground (U.S.A) and Academic Associates Peace works (AAPW)
— 2008: Designed a professional training programme in concepts and methods of peace and conflict studies (PCS), conflict resolution techniques, social peace building, alternative dispute resolution, conflict mainstreaming in development programmes, early warning and response, strategic communication and conflict prevention e.t.c
— 2008: Designed the curriculum of a certificate programme in peace and conflict studies which SCAPP advised against.
— 2009:  The Community Governance, Peace-Building and Sustainable Development Project, approached by the Centre for Social and Corporate Responsibility (CSCR) to design training manual
— 04/10 to 08/11: Collaborative Research on Anomie and Insurgency in the Niger-Delta Funded by Swiss Academy for Development (SAD)
— Design of the Curriculum for the proposed Post Graduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies

 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES
Professional Courses offered by CCGS Categorized into Entry, Operational and Strategic Level Courses

CPC 100: Concepts and Methods of Peace and Conflict
Objective:
• to expose participants to basic dimensions in the theory and practice of peace and conflict

Course Content:
Nature, Types, Causes, Intensity and Stages of conflict, Conflict handling styles, violence/aggression, Social Impact of Conflict, Escalation and De-escalation, Analysis and Management, Preventive Strategies, Early-warning Signs and Monitoring Mechanisms; and Post Conflict Reconstruction.
Peace-making, Peace-keeping, Peace-enforcement, Pre and Post conflict Peace-building and Peace Support Operations.
CPC 110: Conflict Resolution Techniques
Objectives:
• to equip participants with the requisite skills for resolving conflict
• Expose participants to basic tools for understanding the dynamics of conflicts.

Course Content:
Conflict Analysis: Diagnosis, Prognosis, Therapy (D.P.T)-Context, issue and stakeholder analysis, Onion-Doughnut, ABC Triangle, Conflict mapping and Peace analysis
CPC 120: SOCIAL PEACEBUILDING
Objectives:
• To build the capacity of participants to employ appropriate peace building strategies in preventing conflict
• To make participants be conscious of the barriers to sustainable peace building and ways of averting them

 

Course Content:
Social peace, Social peace building, Social peace building strategies, sustainability of Peace-building processes, Respect for human rights, Participatory processes for peace-building, Role of Public Institutions and systems of security and justice.
CPC 200: ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (ADR) SPECTRUM
Objective:
• to train participants on non adversarial ways of managing conflicts
• to build the capacity of participants in third party intervention.
Course Content:
Third Party Intervention, Stake holding in third party intervention, (Multi-track diplomacy), types of third party intervention-communication, collaboration, facilitation, negotiation, conciliation and mediation
CPC 210: CONFLICT MAINSTREAMING IN DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES
   Objectives:
• To train participants on mainstreaming conflict issues in project identification, design and implementation
• Build the capacity of participants on the techniques of conducting needs assessments
Course Content:
Stages of project cycle, Project identification and selection: Stakeholder analysis, Problem tree analysis, Objective analysis, Project analysis and appraisal, Logical framework approach, Conflict mainstreaming in development programmes
CPC 300: Conflict Monitoring and Evaluation Techniques
Objectives:
• To equip participants with the techniques of assessing whether programme/project aims and strategies are relevant to the conflict situation and its handling
• Train participants on ways of determining how a project contributes to conflict transformation
Course Content:
What is monitoring, monitoring indicators, participatory monitoring and evaluation, challenges of participatory monitoring, purpose of evaluation, evaluating peace building programmes, challenges with peace building monitoring and evaluation, setting performance indicators and targets, Monitoring and Evaluation challenges, criteria/skills for selecting evaluators, types of evaluation, ethics of evaluation, How to write and present evaluation reports.           

CPC 310: EARLY WARNING AND EARLY RESPONSE
Objectives:
• To build the capacity of participants to identify conflict signs/indicators
• To sharpen the skills of participants on early warning and possible involvement in peace building and conflict resolution
• To enhance the capacity of participants in the application of the strategies of preventive peace building 

Course Content
Conceptualizing early warning and early response, designing a structural framework for early warning and early response, early warning indicators, early warning and conflict monitoring, early warning as a preventive tool, strategies for response, challenges of early warning and early response,
CPC 320: STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION IN CONFLICT PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT
Objectives:
• To train participants on the use of effective communication channels to prevent or manage conflict
• Build the capacity of participants in handling communication related conflicts

Course Content:
The role of communication in conflict prevention and conflict management, communication strategies, strategic communication, changing behavior, factors that motivate behavioural change-BCOS factors, behavioural change strategies and channels.

CONTACT:

Fidelis Allen, PhD

Ag. Director

Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies
P.M.B 5323
Park,  University of Port Harcourt
Choba, Port Harcourt
Nigeria

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+234 8075111856

 

 

 

[1] CENTECS and PJC-WDGS were established in 2003 and 2011 respectively.

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