Department of Curriculum Studies & Educational Technology

Department of Curriculum Studies & Educational Technology

Department:                                               Department of Curriculum Studies & Educational Technology  
Name of Ag.Head Of Deparment:            Dr. J. W. Dike 
Contact E-mail:                                          This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Contact Phone Number(s):                       08064123812
 
 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF DEPARTMENT

The Department of Curriculum Studies and Educational Technology was established in October 1, 1983 along with other departments in the Faculty of Education. In 2004/2005 academic session emphasis was shifted to Teacher Education which led to a change of the name of the Department to Education Science, based on the guideline from National University Commission (NUC). The Department houses students who offer Science Education in a four years undergraduate academic programme for the award of the Bachelor of Science Education (BSc. Ed) Degree.

Students choose teaching subjects from pure science: Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Computer Science and Mathematics. In addition the department runs a Sandwich Programme in Science Education for serving teachers with teaching subject area option of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Agricultural Science Education and Social Studies Education.

VISION

To be a core centre for training and retraining of science teachers using modern processes, techniques and resources.

MISSION

To train high level manpower, assume instructional responsibilities in pure sciences and in the use of Information and Communication Technology for Teaching and Learning.

PHILOSOPHY OF PROGRAMME

Considering the crucial role of science, technology and mathematics in the development and advancement of our nation socially and economically, a necessity to train high level manpower in Science Education cannot be over emphasized. The overall philosophy of the programme is that of developing professional educators and researchers in the area of science. The M.Edprogramme in science is specially designed to enhance the quality of science teachers to actualize this philosophy. 

OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAMME

Generally, the programme is designed to prepare first degree holders in science for leadership, effective research and teaching at different levels of higher education. Specifically, the programme aims at:

  • Producing science educators who are skilful, knowledgeable and committed to curriculum implementation in science as well as national development
  • Providing intellectual capacity in science to teachers for further development in the area
  • Enhancing in science teachers the concept of scientific literacy and citizenry
  • Developing a practical orientation in science teachers for better teaching in science delivery
  • Developing professional expertise of students in science

OUR CORE VALUES

Student focus

  • Integrity
  • Total Quality Management in Education
  • Team Work
  • Excellence                                

 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES

  • UNDERGRADUATE  COURSES

The Department of Curriculum Studies and Educational Technology offer 4- Year  BSc (HON) Degree programmes in;

Computer Science Education, Biology Education, Chemistry Education, Physics Education, and Mathematics Education,

  • POST GRADUATE COURSES (M.ED AND Ph.D ) IN;
  • Educational Technology, Science Education, Mathematics Education, Language Education and Social Studies Education

Undergraduate  Students offer General Studies Courses offered by the General Studies Unit, Science Courses offered by Faculty of Science/ Department of Animal and Environmental Science/Plant Science and Bio-Technology and education courses offered by Faculty of Education /Department of Curriculum Studies and Educational Technology as well as 12 weeks of Teaching Practice.

 

 

HEADSHIP OF THE DEPARTMENT FROM 1983 – Till Date 

S/No

Name

Duration

1

Dr. J. Adeyinka

1983 – 1985

2

Dr. N.E. Dienye    ( now professor )

1985 – 1987

3

Dr. E.B. Awotua–Efebo ( now professor )

1987 – 1989

4

Dr. H.I. Dike  ( now professor )

1989 – 1991

5

Dr. S.A.U. Ituen   ( now professor )

1991-1993,1993-1995

6

Dr. E.B. Awotua-Efebo    ( now professor )

1995 -1997

7

Dr. S.P.T. Gbamanja        ( now professor )

1997 -1999

8

Dr. H.I. Dike   ( now professor )

1999 – 2001

9

Dr. J. Adeyinka

2001 – 2003

10

Dr. S.A.U. Ituen   ( now professor )

2003 – 2005

11

Dr. B.J. Obomanu  ( now professor )

2005 – 2010

12

Dr.(Mrs.) R.A. Ogunkunle (associate professor, late)

2010 – 2012

13

Dr.(Mrs.) C.N. Olele  ( now professor )

2012 – 2014

14

Dr. Cheta Williams  ( now associate professor )

2014 -  2016

15

Dr. (Mrs.) A.A.O. Mumuni

2016-2018

16.

Dr. J.W. Dike

2018-Date

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF  CURRICULUM STUDIES  AND EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY ACADEMIC AND  ADMINISTATIVE  STAFF  LIST

 

Academic Staf

S/N

NAME

(SURNAME FIRST)

QUALIFICATION

AREA OF SPECIALIZATION

DESIGNATION

  1.  

Prof. Awotua – Efebo, E. B.

B.Sc., Kent State.

M.Ed., Ph.D Wayne State, MITD, UK, FNAE, FNAEMT

Education/

Information

Technology

Professor

  1.  

Prof. (Mrs.) Chukueggu, C.O.C

B.A (Bd)., M.Ed., Ph.D

Language Education

Professor

(Adjunct)

  1.  

Prof.  Obomanu, B.J.

B.Sc., (RSUST)

M.Ed., Ph.D, (UPH)

Science Education

Professor

  1.  

Prof.  Vikoo, B.

B.Ed, M.Ed,  Ph.D (UPH)

Educational Technology

Reader

  1.  

Prof. (Mrs.) Olele,  C.N.

B.A Ed (Nigeria)., M.Ed.,

Ph.D. (UPH)

Education /Information Technology

Reader

  1.  

Dr. (Mrs.) Ekwueme, C.O.

B.A Ed, M.Ed, Ph.D

Mathematics Education

Reader

(Adjunct)

  1.  

Dr.  Williams, C.

B.A.(Ed).,  M.Ed.,

Ph.D (UPH)

Education /Information Technology

Senior Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. (Mrs.) Mumuni, A.A.

B.Sc (Ed).,M.Ed., Ph.D (UPH)

Science Education

Senior Lecturer

  1.  

Dr.(Mrs.) Nwanekezi, A.U.

B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D .(UPH)

Science Education

Reader

  1.  

Dr. Dike, J. W.

HND(RSUST)., PGDE (UPH)., M.Ed (RSUST)., Ph.D (Uyo)

Science Education

Senior Lecturer

Ag: H.O.D.

  1.  

Dr.(Mrs.) Okoro, C.O.

B.Ed.,  M.Ed., Ph.D (UPH)

Curriculum and Instruction

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr.(Mrs.) Arokoyu, A. A.

B.Sc., M.Ed., Ph.D,(UPH)

Science Education

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. Ndioho, O.F.

B.SC, PGDE, B.SC.(Ed)., M.Ed., Ph.D. (UPH)

Science Education
 

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. Mezieobi, S. A.

B.Sc(Ed) (UPH).,

M.Ed (Unijos)., Ph.D (Delsu)

Social Studies Education

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr.(Mrs.) Abraham, L.N.

B.A.(Ed) (Unilag)., M.Ed., Ph.D (UPH)

Education /Information Technology

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr.(Mrs.) Anekwe, J.U.

NCE, B.Ed., M.Ed.,

Ph.D (UPH)

Education /Information Technology

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. Saliu, A.D.

B.Sc(Ed), M.Ed , PhD(UPH)

Curriculum and Instruction

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. Anyanwu, J.

NCE, B.Sc. (Ed) (RSCOE);

M.Ed. PhD (UPH)

Social Studies Education

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. (Mrs.) Njoku, C.

B.Sc.(Ed), M.Ed ,Ph.D (UPH)

Social Studies Education

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. Oriji, A.

CLS (ABU) DLS.,B.Sc (Ed).,

M.Ed., PhD (UPH)

Education/Information Technology

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. Brown, T.

NCE.,  B.Ed.,(RSCOE)

M.Ed, PhD (UPH)

Social Studies Education

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. Birabil, S. T.

NCE., (Oyo)., B.Ed, M.Ed, PhD. (UPH)

Social Studies Education      

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Dr. (Mrs) Fomsi, E.F.

NCE(Ankpa)., B.Ed., M.Ed,PhD

 (UPH)

Education/Information Technology

Senior

Lecturer

  1.  

Mr. Alfred, O. D.

NCE (RSCOE)., B.Ed,

M.Ed (Ibadan)

Language Education

Lecturer I

  1.  

Dr. Ucheoma, M. C.

NCE (Alvan).,B.Sc(Ed) (UNN)., M.Ed. (Unical).,

Ph.D. (Absu)

Curriculum and Instruction

Lecturer I

  1.  

Dr. Agwu, C.

 B.Sc., PGDE., M.Ed.,

 PhD (UPH)

Education/Information Technology

Lecturer I

  1.  

Dr. (Mrs.) Anikpo, F. O.

B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D(UPH)

Education/Information Technology

Lecturer I

  1.  

Dr.(Mrs.) Obafemi, D. T. A.

B.Sc (U.I)., PGDE M.Ed., Ph.D (UPH)

Science Education

Lecturer I

  1.  

Dr.(Mrs) Abe, E. C.

B.A(ED)., M.ED,Ph.D (UPH)

 Education/Information Technology

Lecturer I

  1.  

Dr (Mrs.) U. Idoghor

BA (ED), PGDGS (UNIABU), M.Ed (UPH), Ph.D, LLB Law (UNIABU)

Gender Studies & Curriculum

                 Lecturer II

  1.  

Dr. (Mrs.) Avwiri, E.

B.Sc (UPH)., M.Ed (UST), PhD(UPH)

Science Education

 Lecturer II

  1.  

Dr. (Mrs.) Ochuba, O.O.

B.A.PGDE (UPH)

M.Ed (Nigeria), PhD (UPH)

Language Education

 Lecturer II

  1.  

Dr. Mrs.)Lady Charles-Ogan

B.Sc (Ed) M.Ed (Uyo),PhD (UPH)

Mathematics Education

Lecturer II

  1.  

Dr (Mrs.). N. B.  Nwankwo

B.Ed(UNN), M.Ed,PhD(UPH)

Social Studies Education

Lecturer II

  1.  

Dr. Eralei, C.I.

B.Sc Ed, M.Ed, Ph.D (UPH)

Education Technology

Lecturer II

  1.  

Dr.(Mrs.) H.A.

Agbarakwe,  

B.Sc.,  M.Ed (UPH)

Education/Information Technology

Lecturer II

  1.  

Ezeoguine, E.P.

B.Sc (Ed) M.Ed (UPH)

Educational Technology 

Asst. Lecturer

  1.  

Miss Adesope Rebecca Yinka

NCE (Omoku), B.Sc, (Ed), M.Ed (UPH)

Science Education

Asst. Lecturer

  1.  

Miss. Ogali, T.U.

B.Sc (Ed)., M.Ed inview (UNN)

Home Management

Asst. Lecturer

  1.  

Mrs.  Q.U. Nwaizugbu 

B.Sc ., M.Ed (UPH)

Educational Technology 

Asst. Lecturer

  1.  

Mrs. S.E. Augustine,

B.Tech. (Owerri)

Educational Technology

Asst. Lecturer

 

 

Technical/Administrative Staff Department of Curriculum Studies and Educational Technology

S/N

Name

(SURNAME FIRST)

Rank/Designation, Date of First Appointment

Qualifications, Dates Obtained Membership of Professional Association

Duties Performed/Courses Taught

  1.  

Mr. Ramos Ebiotubo Ekiyor

Senior Arts Fellow

9th Feb. 1989

B.A. M.Sc.

TX USA (1984, 1987)

Academic Support Services

  1.  

Mr. Ogwogwo, Woke

Asst. Tech. Officer

01/06/82

FSLC, TRADE TEST  I,  II & III

Asst. Technical Officer Under Academic Support Services

  1.  

Mrs. Sibe, Felicia Bariduanen

Administrative Officer

01/12/2008

B.Sc Ed Uniport,

WASC

Administration

  1.  

Mr. Nzekwe, Maclean Ngozi

Higher Executive Officer

WASC, Dip. Law, Dip. Banking and Finance

Administration

  1.  

Mr. Amadi Nathan Nnadi

Higher Executive Officer

B.Sc 2004

Administration

  1.  

Mr. Pepple, Rowland

Snr. Photographer

1st Nov, 1990

WASC, Cert. in Camera Operation

Video Coverage of Academic Presentation

  1.  

Mr. Madise, Awaovie

Asst. Tech. Officer

8th June, 1993

Trade Test  II & III

Technical Duties

  1.  

Mrs. Neeborn, Sira Edna

Computer Operator

27/2/2007

WASC, DIP. in Computer Opt.

Computer Operator

  1.  

Mrs. Oriji, Christiana

Clerical Officer II

01/08/96

WASC

Clerical Duties

  1.  

Mr. Basil, Wobodo

Senior Driver

 

 

  1.  

Mr. Nwoha Samuel

 

 

Head Lab. Assistant

  1.  

Miss Wosu Favour Ogonda

Head Lab. Attendant

O’Level WASC

Head, Laboratory Attendant

  1.  

Mrs. Ocheke Lucy Oius

Lab. Attendant

WASC

Lab. Assistant

  1.  

Mrs. Nwinye Comfort

Caretaker

FSLC

Cleaning Duties

  1.  

Mrs. Cecilia, Ihua

Lab. Attendant

 

Cleaning Duties

 

DEPARTMENTAL  RESPONSIBILITY

Academic Advisers:

Year I     U2018 – Dr. Eralei, C.I. / Mrs. Q.U. Nwaizugbu

Year II    U2017 – Dr. T. Brown/ Dr. (Mrs.) G.I. Charles-Ogan

Year III   U2016 - Dr.(Mrs.) Njoku C./Dr. (Mrs.) A.H. Agbarakwe

Year IV   U2015 -  Dr. Mrs. O.O. Ochuba/Dr. Mrs. U Idoghor/

                Dr. Mrs. B.N. Nwankwo

Year V    U2014  - Dr. (Mrs.) E.F. Fomsi/ Mrs. E.P. Ezeoguine

Year VI   U2013- Dr. T. Birabil/ Dr. Mrs. E. Avwiri

Year VII  U2012  -Dr.(Mrs.) L.N. Abraham /Dr.(Mrs) E.C. Abe

 

Co-ordinator - Dr. D.T.A. Obafemi, Dr. E. Avwiri and Miss R.Y. Adesope

  • Time Table Officer: Dr. S.A. Mezieobi
  • Officer in charge of Departmental Library: Dr. Chris Agwu
  • Examination Officer Dr. D.T.A. Obafemi
  •  
  • UNITS CO-ORDINATORS

Curriculum Studies and Evaluation – Dr. C.O. Okoro

Science/Mathematics Education – Dr. (Mrs.) Nwanekezi

Educational Technology/Computer Science Education – Dr. C. Williams

Art of Teaching/Micro-Teaching –  Dr S.A Mezieobi and  Dr. A.A.O. Mumuni

Language Education – Mr. D.O. Alfred

Social Studies Education – Dr. S.A. Mezieobi

Science course in the Faulty of Science-Dr (Mrs) E. Avwiri

General  Studies Courses –Dr. S.T. Birabil.

 

ACADEMIC STAFF OF THE DEPARTMENT OF  PLANT SCIENCE AND BIO- TECHNOLOGY   HANDLING BOILOGY  EDUCATION STUDENTS

 

S/N

NAME

QUALIFICATION

AREA OF SPECIALIZATION

DESIGNATION

1.

Arene, F.O.I.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Parasitology Pathology 

Professor

2.

Awi-Waadu, G.D.B.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Parasitology Ecology & Pathology

Professor

3.

Sikoki, F.D.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Fisheries/

Hydrobiology

Professor

4.

Agu, G.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Animal Physiology

Professor

5.

Akonye L.A.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Plant/Environmental Stress/Physiological Toxicology

Professor

6.

Obute, G.C.

B.Sc., Ph.D

Biosystematics Cytogenetic

Professor

7.

Nzeako, O.S.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Parasitology

Assistant Lecturer

8.

Eremrena, P.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Plant Physiology

Assistant Lecturer

9

Dr. E.B. Ochekwu

 

 

 

10

Prof. B.C. Ndukwu

 

 

 

11

Mr. Albert

 

 

 

 

Professional staff in Department of Plant Science and Bio- Technology  Handling Biology Education Students

S/NO

Names of Staff

Designation

  1.  

Dr. A.E. Abah

ChiefTechnologist

  1.  

Mrs. H. Onoja

A/Chief Med. Lab. Scienctist

  1.  

Mr. O.P. Onyagbodor

Snr. Technologist

  1.  

Mr. E. Maduike

Snr. Technologist

 

 

COURSES OFFERED BY BIOLOGY EDUCATION STUDENTS AND COURSE DESCRIPTION                                    

YEY    YEAR ONE FIRST SEMESTER                          

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 100.1

Communication Skills in English

3

2.

GES 102.1

Introduction to Philosophy  and Logic

2

3.

EDU 100.1

Introduction  to Education

2

4.

EDU 101.1

Introduction to Teaching Profession

2

5.

EDU 103.1

Theory & Practice of Physical  Activity Skills & Techniques I

1

6.

CHM 130.1

General Chemistry I

3

7.

FSB 101.1

General Biology I

3

8.

PHY 101.1

Mechanical and Properties of Matter

3

                    TOTAL

19

YEA    YEAR ONE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 101.2

Computer Appreciation & Application

3

2.

GES 103.2

Nigerian Peoples and Culture

2

3.

EDU 101.2

Instructional Technology

2

4.

EDU 103.2

Theory & Practice  of Physical Activity Skills & Technique 11

1

5.

CHM 131.2

General  Chemistry II

3

6.

CHM 132.2

Intro. to Principles of Org. Chemistry

3

7.

FSB 102.2

General Biology II

3

                   TOTAL

17

YEA    YEAR TWO FIRST SEMESTER                  

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.1

Developmental Psychology

2

2.

EDU 201.1

History of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.1

Classroom Management

2

4.

EDU 2CS.1

Community Service

1

5.

MCB 200.1

General Microbiology

3

6.

FSB 201.1

Cell Biology

3

7.

PSB 201.1

Structure and Function of a Plant

3

8.

AEB 205.1

Animal Behaviour

2

                    TOTAL

18

YEA    YEAR TWO SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.2

Art of Teaching

3

2.

EDU 201.2

Foundation of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.2

Sociology of Education

2

4.

EDU 202.3

Micro-Teaching

1

5.

EDU 202.2

Element of Special Education

2

6.

EDU 204.2

Supervised Teaching Practice I

2

7.

FSB 202.2

Genetics I

3

8.

FSB 203.2

Biological Techniques

2

9.

FSB 204.2

General Ecology

3

                   TOTAL

20

YEA       YEAR THREE FIRST SEMESTER                               

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 300.1

Curriculum Development and Instruction  

2

2.

EDU 301.1

Philosophy of Education

2

3.

EDU 302.1

Psychology of Learning

3

4.

EDU 303.1

Supervision and Leadership Behavior in Education

2

5.

EDU 305.1

Educational Technology

2

6.

AEB 302.1

Protochordates and Chordates

3

7.

FSB  301.1

Genetics II

3

8.

PSB 300.1

Mycology

3

9.

PSB 307.1

Weed Science

3

                    TOTAL

23

YEA    YEAR THREE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 300.2

Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

2

2.

EDU 301.2

Methods Course in Discipline Area

2

3.

EDU 302.2

ICT in Education

2

4.

EDU 303.2

Research Methods and Statistics

3

5.

EDU 304.2

Supervised Teaching Practice II

4

6.

EDC 305.2

Lab. Org. & Management

3

7.

EDC 306.2

Media Systems

3

                   TOTAL

19

YEA    YEAR FOUR FIRST SEMESTER                 

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 400.1

Management in Education

2

2.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

3.

EDU 401.1

Test and Measurement

2

4.

EDU 402.1

Computer Education

2

5.

PSB 401.1

Plant Pathology

3

6.

PSB 405.1

Conservation & Development of Natural Resources

2

7.

AEB 451.1

Comparative Anatomy & Physiology

3

                    TOTAL

14

        

 YEA    YEAR FOUR SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 404.2

Comparative Education

2

2.

EDU 405.2

Continuous Assessment

2

3.

EDU 402.2

Guidance and Counselling

2

4.

FSB 406.2

Molecular Biology

3

5.

PSB 402.2

Economic Plants

1

6.

AEB 487.2

Environmental Policies and Laws

3

 

 

OR

 

7.

AEB 457.2

Reproductive and Developmental Biology

3

         TOTAL

17

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR EDUCATION COURSES HOUSED IN THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION/DEPARTMENT

EDU 100.1: Introduction to Education (1 Unit)

This course presents a general introduction to Education as a discipline and as a profession. Students will be introduced to the scope of education, its roles in society and why teachers study education. Added to this, the course will introduce students to knowledge of specialized areas in education. These include Educational Management, Psychology, Guidance and Counseling and Foundations, Educational awareness of their interrelationships and importance.

EDU 101.2: Instructional Technology (2 Units)

This course exposes students to the different misconceptions of the field of educational technology. This is followed by modern definition of educational technology. The course presents the different classes of audiovisual materials and their production, to produce/improvise and audiovisual material for use during teaching practice.

EDU 200.2: Art of Teaching (2 Units)

This course is supposed to develop teacher’s competence in school pedagogy. It explores the teaching process in relation to the purpose of education, human growth and personality, the nature of learning, the dynamics of groups, the nature of subject matter and evaluation. The course will provide opportunity for stimulated microteaching.

EDU 2CS.1: Community Service (1 Unit)

This is a community-based practical exercise in which students will develop curriculum packages to solve societal problems. This will take the form of workshops at community halls, village squares etc. It will also entail developing training packages for illiterate skilled and unskilled craftsmen in both urban and rural settings.

EDU 300.1: Curriculum Development and Instruction (2 Units)

This is a basic course, which exposes students to curriculum development models, patterns of curriculum organization, sequencing of curriculum content. The course system will lay emphasis on how to produce relevant curriculum for the 9-3-4 system of education in Nigeria. The relationship between evaluation and effective curriculum development will be explicated.

EDU 301.2: Method Course (2 Units)

The course is designed to expose teachers to the various teaching methods. The characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of each method will be explored. The concept of individualization of instruction as an innovative teaching approach will be presented. Different individualized teaching strategies will also be presented. Efforts will be geared towards producing a highly purposeful and self-directed learner and to turn a teacher from being a dispenser of information to a facilitator of learning.

EDU 303.2: Basic Statistics and Research Methods (3 Units)

The course is designed to acquaint students with the nature and scope of statistics. It covers basic descriptive statistics-data collection, measures of frequency distribution, central tendency and dispersion. Students are introduced to inferential statistics – parametric and non-parametric tests as a means for scientific study. Introduction to research – definitions and values. Types of research, descriptive, experimental, quasi-experimental, phenomenology etc. and steps in conducting research, problem formulation, methodology and data analysis and reporting. Documentation in research – various formats: Harvard citation, Vancouver (numbering) and American Psychological Association (APA) style will be presented.

EDU 305.2: Laboratory Organization and Management (1 Unit)

Shortage and handling of chemicals care, use and maintenance of basic laboratory equipment e.g balance, microscope, electrical meters, batteries etc. handling of glassware, purification of water by distillation – management of practice class. Management of a Laboratory store – taking inventory, issuance of materials, retrieval of materials and safety in the laboratory.

EDU306.2: Media Systems

This course exposes students to modern information Technology gadgets as they apply to classroom instruction. This course will emphasize the process approach to instructional development and the integration of appropriate media materials.

EDU 401.2: Computer in Education (2 Units)

Curriculum specialists can no longer ignore the impact of computer technology in this 21st century. To overcome the problems inherent in being computer illiterate, this course will expose students to the rudiments of computer literacy. Students will be exposed to the use of application software, the internet, and the application of the principles of information and communication technology to education.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR COURSES OFFERED BY BIOLOGY EDUCATION OPTION HOUSED IN THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE / DEPARTMENT OF PLANT SCIENCE AND BIO-TECHNOLOGY AND ANIMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY

PSB 101.1 General Biology

Characteristics of life, investigations in Biology; the scientific method; the substance or life; the unit of life (including methods of study); activities of cells; The control of metabolic activities; basic principles of inheritance (genetics); evolution (3 Credits)

MCB 200.1 General Microbiology I

History and development of Microbiology; medical characteristic of microorganisms, growth and reproduction; principles of sterilization and disinfection; problems of ineffectivity; brief survey of microorganisms as friends and foes; antimicrobial agents and sensitivity tests (3 Credits)

FSB 201.1 Cell Biology

Modern concept relating to the cell; a study of the molecular organization, function and assembly of eukaryotic cell Components, including membranes and membranous organelles, ribosomes, cilia and flagella, microtubules, microfilaments, nuleic and chromosomes, metabolic; energy; cellular dynamics. (3 Credits).

BCH 11CR 210.1  General Biochemistry I

Acidity and alkalinity, pH and pH values and their effects on Cellular activities; buffers; chemistry or amino Acids; proteins, and their derivatives, methods of isolation and identification; Primary and secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures of Proteins; determination and biochemical application of the Structures, chemistry and structure of carbohydrates, their nomenclature; Chirality (3 Credits)

CUM 260.1 Organic Chemistry I

Fundamental principles of chemical reactivity; chemical reactions and synthesis ofmonofunctional compounds; reactions and mechanism of common reactions; stereochemistry (3 Credits).

MTH 280.1 Introduction to Computer programming

Historical details of computers; principles of programming; programming with FORTRAN Language. (3 Credits)

AEB 205.1 Animal Behaviour

Forms of behavior; reflexes and complex behaviuor; development of behaviour; adaptiveness and adaptability of behavior; importance of instinct and learning in animal Kingdom; evolution of behavioural patterns; cultural transmission of behavior; sexual isolation; imprinting; animal communication, migration and navigation; conflict behavior; Courtship; social behavior; animal associations and aggregations (2 Credits).

SECOND YEAR SECOND SEMESTER

AEB 200.2 Lower Invertebrates

Protozoa,  Porifera, Coelenterata, Helminths, Acoelomates and Pseudocoelomates; Gross, microscopic  and ultrastructures. locomotion, nutrition, metabolism, growth, reproduction of Rhizopoda. flagellates, sporozoans and ciliates; ecology 01 protozoans; parasitic and symbiotic protozoa; morphology. anatomy, life histories and some aspects of the physiology and behavior of Tdrbellaria, Trematoda. nernatode and Acanthocephala: brief discussion of Gastrotrihia. Rotifera Kinorhynchia and Gnathostomulida. (3 Credits).

PSB 206.2 Seedless Plants I

Morphology, range of structure, physiology and reproduction of algae, bryophytes and pleridophytes. (2 Credits)

AEB 201.2 Higher Invertebrates

Phylum Annelida: true coelomates, functions of coelom, Characteristics of the Phylu; Classofocatopm-{plychaetes, Oligochaetes, Hirudinea; Diversity in locomotion, eprcduction, feeding and mode of life; Role of earthworms in oil. Phylum Mollusca: Characteristics, torsion: advantages and disadvantages; Classification into classes (characteristics), sub-classes (characteristics); Gastropod diversity:

eproduction, locomotion, feeding, mode of life; Modification f the basic molluscan structure in Bivalvia; Modification in ephalopods for Carnivorous life. Class Crustacea: differences between Crustacea and other classes in the phylum Arthropoda; Classification into sub-classes (characteristics), daptive radiation as they relate to habitats; Respiration, eproduction, locomotion, mode of life. Phylum chinodennata: Characteristics; Phylogenetic relationship to ie chordates; Classification and characteristics of the major classes; Minor Phyla: Bryozoa, Chaetognatha: characteristics, adaptations to habitats and mode of life. (3 Credits)

PSB 201.2 Structure and function of seed Plants

The main structural and functional features of the adult plant and its parts — leaves, stems, roots, flower and fruits. These Structures are treated in relation to functions such as plant/water relations, nutrition, photosynthesis, respiration, growth and development, reproduction and movement (3 Credits).

PSB 202.2 Genetics I

Heritability and non-heritable characteristics; Mendelian genetics; Gene interactions, quantitative genetics; Extra-chromosomal inheritance, sex determinations, linkage and recombination in eukaryotes; introduction to recombination in prokaryotes; chromosome morphology, variations in polidy and level and chromosome bahviour. (3 Credits)

FSB 203.2 Biological Techniques

Procedure for collection, identification and preservation of biological specimens, sampling techniques; wax embedding techniques; photometry, Colorimetry, Chromatograph, Eletrophoresis and conductometry. Experimental design and analysis. (3 Credits)

FSB 204.2 (General Ecology)

Ecological factors and cycles; ecosystems and energy flow; water and nutrient budgets; population attributes (treat to include analysis of variance and organization and gynamics of ecological communities in soil, fresh water and sea); Succession and climax Ecological methods; Man and the biosphere; Increase in human population and its consequences. (3 Credits)

AEB 300.1 Ichthyology and Hydrobiology

Physical and chemical properties of both inland and seawater; hydrobiology and water cycle; properties of natural and manmade lakes; thermal properties and stratification. hydrobiological cycles; physic-chemical and morphometric variables of inland waters; biogeochemical cycling of essential nutrients; Freshwater organisms including bacteria; fingi aglae, jPlankton. macrophytes and macro invertebrates. (3 Credits)

AEB 301.1 Introduction to Parasitology

The nature of parasitism; history of parasitology; types of parasites and hosts; evolution of parasitism; host specificity; Jecology, life cycles, pathology, and control of protozoal and he1minth parasites; parasitic diseases of man and animals; host parasite interactions. (3 Cre,dits).

AEB 302.1 Protochordates and Chordates

General Introduction; characteristics of phylum chordate; the Invertebrate chordates; Urochordates and Cephalochordates; general features and biology-nutrition, excretion, internal transport, nervous system reproduction; Subphylum Vertebrate: Fishes, Amphibians and Reptiles, Birds and Mammals (general characteristics, daptations, evolution) Primates, nonhuman and human, primate groups; human characteristics evolution, Apes and hominids; the ape men, Homo erectus, Homo sapiens (3 Credits).

FSB 303.1 Population And Production Ecology

The concept of population; characteristics of population; the nature regulation of plant numbers; inventory of plant production processes, thermodynamics and factors of production in plant communities, gross and primary production; measurement of production. (below/above ground and litter) in various communities aquatic rangelands and forests; assessment of animal use (range and brousing) of plant production; vegetation management for production ion sustained-yield basis,(3Credits).

AEB 381.1 Environmental and Conversation Science

Composition of soil Aquatic and aerial environmental; Sources of pollution; kinds of pollutants, Species protection; Biotopes; Biosphere reserves, restoration ecology, sustainable conservation; Trans location, re-introduction, re-establishment; Succession,

AEB 384.1 Environ mental Assessment and Monitoring

Phases in environmental assessment predictive monitoring; Interpretation of environmental effects during and after development activity; Environmental Impact Assessment(EIAO; Impact Assessment Network Simple Models in Environmental Assessment Phases in Ecological Risk Assessment, Limitations. Biological Monitoring. Marine(Near Coastal/Brackish (Wetland), Ecosystems, forest Ecosystems, Agro-ecosystems freshwater Ecosystem, Arid Ecosystem.

AEB 380.2 Industrial Experience (SIWES)

Students are allowed to embark on a 6-month industrial training in the Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES), in the Second Semester of the third year of the programme. At the end of the Scheme, students shall present Seminar on the knowledge and skill acquired which will be typed, bound and properly documented and two copies submitted, to the SIWES Unit coordinator after the oral presentation within four weeks of the first semester fourth year(9 credits)

Bioindicators —Monitor, Sentinel, Indicator Species 1utomated Biomonitors, Biomarkers-Types, Limitations, vantages. Comparison of biological and chemical assessment Environmental Forecasting.

AEB 481.1 Terrestrial Arthropods

Characteristic of the phylum Arthropoda and the major terrestrial classes —Insecta, Arachinida, vlyriapoda. Morpholo.gy and anatomy of the insect. The integument. Physiology of the insect --Locomotion, feeding, nutrition, circulation, reproduction, melamorphasis, moulting, growth etc. Diversity in the other arthropodan classes (3 Credits)

AEB 482.1 Animal Physiology

Introduction: System. Blood and Body Fluids, Respiration, Cardiovascular System, Kidney and Excretion, co-ordinationand Integration Sensory Physiology, Central Nervous System, Autonomic Nervous System Muscle Physiology,

Neuromuscular Transmission; Growth and Development; Endocrinology and Reproduction (3 Credits)

AEB 481.2 Seminar

Library literature project on any approved topic in the candidate’s option. The seminar will be typed bound and properly documented and 2 copies submitted to the department after the oral presentation (3 Credits).

AEB 482.0 Research Project

An experimental investigation of an animal or environmental biology problem in the candidate’s area or option under the supervision of an academic staff member assigned by the Department. Typed and bound copies of the project report will be submitted to the department before its assessment by the external examiner (6 Credits)

AEB 451.1 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology

Vertebrate plan and phylogeny, adaptation and evolution. General and integrated principles of vertebrate structure and morphology, vertebrate skeletal adaptations to life in water, land and air. Comparative anatomy and physiology of vertebrate respiratory structure, comparative feeding, comparative gaseous exchange, development of the urino-genital system, osmo-regulation in different habitats (water and land) salt and water balance, thermoregulation, endocrine control of physiological system (3 credit).

AEB 453.1 Pests and Diseases in Animal Health

Arthropod pests of animals insects and acarine pests; their effects, and control. The use of pesticides and biological control, livestock heath, features of diseases of animals (2 f Credits).

AEB 454.1 Histology and Histo-chemistry Introduction to histology.

Types of tissues, epithelia, glands, blood and lymph, blood cell formation connective tissue, cartilage, the skin, bone, bone formation and development muscular and nervous tissue; the spleen, hypophysis thymus, histology of the Gastro-intestinal system, interaction of preservation with tissues interaction of stains with cellular components (3 Credits)

AEB 470.1 Nigeria Feeds Feedstuffs and Animal Care

Classification of foods, food-stuffs and feed supplement. An extensive coverage of the chemistry and nutritive values of succulent food stuff, concentrate feeds (cereals and some Nigerian grasses and legume species.’ Consideration of methods of their biological value evaluation. Role of nutrients in development, growth maturation and ageing. Nutritional disorders. Lab. Safety precautions; lab. Accidents and prevention. Animal housing, feeding, watering; Ethics in animal experiments, Animal health care.

Second Semester AEB 455.2 Patho-physiology Abnormalities, in somatic cell replication, cancer, agranulocytosis, Leukamia; disorders in circulatory system blood clothing; cardiac function; pathologies in lung function abnormalities in acid/base balance; renal diseases, hypertension. The brain disorder in motor and behaviourai, functions; disorders of vision and auqition; gastro-intestine disorders; abnormalities in body temperature regulation; abnormalities in endocrine function; disorders in male and female sexual function. (3 Credits)

AEB 456.2 Environmental Physiology of animals

Physiological adaptation of animals to different environments. The nature and levels of adaptation fundamental mechanism of1 adaptation, problem of size and stale, water, ions and osmotic physiology, Animal water balance, osmoregulation and excretion, metabolism and energy supply, temperature and its effects, marine life, shoreline and estuaries, fresh water, terrestrial life, extreme terrestrial habitats, parasitic habitats. (3 Credits)

AEB 457.2 Developmental and Reproductive Physiology

Modes of reproduction: sexual, asexual: reproductive structures: reproductive hormones and reproductive cycles: primordial germ cells: spermatogenesis and oogenesis, ovulation and fertilization; blastocyst formation, implantation, sex determination: maintenance of pregnancy; fetal growth; maturation and lactation; pregnancy losses and birth defects; sexually-transmitted diseases; growth, maturation and puberty; senescence. Artificial control of reproduction: artificial insemination; applied animal reproduction and management eg. Grasscutter production; avian reproduction, (3 Credits).

AEB 458.2 Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering

Biological macromolecules: protein, carbohydrates, Lipids; NA, DNA. I the genetic code and protein synthesis; Gene function in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; Recombinant DNA: restriction enzymes, vectors, analysis ofcloned gene sequence; engineering in animals: transgenic animals. I the human genome project. DNA probes and genetic disorders: examples. I Synthesis of human insulin. (2 Credits)

 

Electives: Anyone of the following:

AEB 441.2 Immunology and Immuno-pathology

Effectors of immunity, control of immunity, immunological tolerance, immunity and infections diseases, immune-diagnosis of parasites infections, principles of immunopatholopgy anaphylaxis cytotoxicity, immune complex disorders, hypersensitivity reactions, allergies, immune-deficiency disease, auto-immune disorders. (3 Credits).

AEB 459.2 Pharmacological Animal Physiology

The study of aspects of the interactions of chemical and natural substance with animal tissues. Significance of some animals in pharmacological Animal Physiology study of aspects of the interactions of chemical and natural stance with animal tissues. Significance of some animals in :pharmacological/physiological studies e.g. coelenterates, snakes, scorpion, some fishes etc. Luminescence in animals. t Drug administration routes in animals to examine physiological effects. Mechanisms of drug action and the effect of chemicals/drugs in different animals Basic Drug-receptorinteractions. Correlation of structure with biological activity. Selectivity of drugs in animals. Time course. of drug action. Effect of poisons/toxins on the physiology of animals. Principles of selective toxicity. Biological control Acquired resistance to drugs-loss of selectivity. Isolation and purification of biologically active compounds from animals. Bioassay methods.(3 Credits).

AEB 410.1

Importance

Arthropods of medical and Veterinary importance. Direct effects-myiasis, allergies, environmization, etc. Indirect effect — roles as intermediate hosts and Vectors. Types of transmission- mechanical and biological. Biology, mode of life, behavior, etc. of these arthropods. Their roles in the epidemiology of human (malaria, trypanosomiasis, le ishmaniasis, yellow fever, Onchocerciasis, lymphatic ficariasis etc.) and epidootioLogy of animal (anaplasmesis, babesiosis, Est Coast Fever, etc.) diseases.

AEB 411.1 Arthropods and Vertebrate Pests of Field Crops & Stored Products

Major arthropod pests of vegetable crops (tomatoes, okra, onions, melon). Arthropod pests of legumes, Cereals, tuber crops, and cash crops (oil palm, tobacco, cocoa, coffee, cashew). For each group of crops, cuss nature of damage, life history and distribution. Arthropod pests of stored cereals, Legumes oil seeds, timber, clothes, hides, skins and fish biology, bionomics, behavior, population dynamics. Adaptation to storage ecosystem. Impact of type of storage system on pest population — growth rates, and role of pheromones in postbiology. Types of Vertebrate pests (rodents and other small mammals, large mammals-wild and domesticated, birds. reptiles etc) of field. crops and stored products. Aspects of biology, behavior, seasonal activity cycles as they related to damage. Nature of damage (direct and indirect) to field crops and stored products. (3 Credits)

AEB412.1 Arachnology

Characteristics of the class. Classification, scorpionide, Araneida, Acrina, etc. sub-orders of the Acrina-Mesostigmata, population dynamics. Diversity in habitat, niches, mode of life etc. Adaptations. (3 Credits).

AEB 421.1 Management of Arthropod Pests in Human and Animal Health Crops and Stored Products.

Definition of pests, Causes of pest outbreaks, pest resurgence, mointoring pest populations in the field and storage. Management technique cultural, Biological, Crop resistance, genetic, chemical, and behavioural manipulations. Integrated Pest Management (1PM) —determination and application of economic injury level and economic threshold. Management control of vertebrate pests of field crops and ;stored products. Practicals in agricultural Pests management. Formulation and application of insecticides: dusts, granules, wettable powders emulsifiable concentrates, aerosols, fumigants, fogs, smokes, and baits. Methods of insecticide application to the soil, water, seed treatment, and application to crops. Equipment for application of insecticides, types of no77le and nozzle calibration, knapsack sprayer (3 Credits)

AEB 422.2 Aquatic Entomology

General morphoplogy of aquatic insects — head, Torax, and Abdomen collecting, sampling, and methods for aquatic inrt Aquatic insect respiration, habitat, life history and behavioural adaptations. Ecology and distribution of aquatic insects. General classification and key tO the orders of aquatic insects. Aquatic collembolan, hamiptera, trichoptera. (3 Credits).

AEB 480.1 Project Implementation and Evaluation

Types ofproject, Project-planning, cost benefit analysis, project evaluation, project reporting project execution, feasibility of environmental project; decision making; project planning, clientele participation, associations and co-operatives community participation. (2 Credits)

AEB 483.1

Techniqies in Environmental Studies Techniques in environmental microbiology, techniques in faunal and floral studies, population studies of fauna, Dispersion. Ecological diversity and measurements, diversity indices, models, population dynamics.( 3 Credits).

AEI3 484.1 Environmental Health

Common environmental hazards, their causes and sources; Industrial, laboratory and field hazards. Communicable disease and biological hazards, pests hazards. Pollution monitoring, a re pollution, insecticides, herbicides, nematicides, noise pollution, radiation ecology, oil and petroleum-related pollution, prediction and management of hazards. Global distribution of hazards. Pest-hazard operation- rescue, emergency services, pest trauma services etc. Environmental laws as they affect human health. (3 Credits).

AEB 485.1 Eco-toxicology/toxinology

Classification of pollutants (petroleum, industrial effluents. ;gasses,. insecticides, herbicides, sewage, nematicides etc) General environmental protection, protection in a oil and gas industry. Effects of pollutants in populations, communities and ecosystems. Transport of pollutants in the environment through food chains and aerial pathways; biological amplification. Determination and quantification of pollutant levels. Production of ecological effects within organisms and on ecosystems. Cause-and-effects relationships that control levels and variability of pollution concentration over time and space. Dose-response curves and, factors affecting them. Regulation ‘of new chemical monitoring of named species. Case studies. Effects oftoxins ofnatural products. (3 Credits)

AEB 486.1 — Biodiversity, Forest and Wildlife Management

Biodiversity — definition, biological evolution, Environmental factors that effect diversity, Reasons for preserving diversityEvaluation, numeric diversity measures, multivariatetechniques and graphical, methods, diversity indices.Biodiversity differences in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.Land resources assessment and classification. Land-usePlanning. The Landscape Concept. Forests and Forestry.Sustainable Forestry. Approaches to ForestmanagementParksand Preserves as Islands. Wildlife species in Nigeria and their management. Official Categories of Threat. Distributional records — Climate mapping, migrant species, fine scale maps,Geographic Information Systems (CIS).Habitat improvement, game farming, artificial, stocking, preservation of breeding stocks by means of game laws. Traditional single species. Wildlife management Improved Approaches to Wildlife management (3 Credits)

 

Elective:

AEB 406.1 Evolution and Zoogeography

Evolution theory, Darwinism, Origin of life; Proofs of evolution; Geologic time scales, Principles of evolution; natural and artificial selection, hybridization, mutation. Species concept and speciation: Zoogeography ofthe world (3 Credits)

Second Semester:

AEB 487.2 Environmental Policies and Laws

National and international environmental protection-policies and laws; international concepts. Green house index as globalecological indicator, ecological forecasting. Nigeria policies and laws. FEPA Act Cap. 126. Selections 7,8,10, w 29,30 and 36. Oil and navigable water cap 337. Pest control of produce Act Cap.349. Harmful wastes (special provision) Act Cap 165 (3 Credits)

AEB 488.2 Waste Management

Biological and non-biological wastes, strategies of waste management and control treatment of degradable wastes. Waste management in urban and rural organisms associated with waste management. Engineering methods for waste managements Assessment of management approaches (3Credits)

AEB 489.2 Environmental Biotechnology

Use of biotechnology principles in pollution control and clean up Biotechnology in media contamination. Enzymes in waste treatment anaerobic treatment of hazardous waste sewage treatment, biodeterioration, bioremediation, bi opreservation, production of biogas. Biotechnology in energy production. Biotechnology in environmental management. (3 Credits)

 

Electives:

PSB 405.2 Conservation and Development ofNatural Resources

Analysis of the concept of conservation, development and natural resources. Classification of natural resources. Abiotic and biotic resources, stock and flow resources, and rationale for conservation. Ecology of natural resources. Enventory techniques for bio-natural resources conservation approaches for abiotic and biotic resources. Development and management of bio-natural resources human communities, grasslands, forests, fisheries and wildlife. Conservation of our bio-physical environments —urban and rural (3 Credits).

PSB 415.2 Bioremediation

Revegetation methods, Soil amelioration methods, identification and preparation of potential plants (algae, propagates and plant detoxification mechanisms on soil, air, and water environments, physiological conditions governing decomposition of pollutants, assessment of toxicity levels (lethal doses) of pollutants, establishment of plant monitors and water sanitizers, uptake mechanism and bioaccumulation by plant cells, roots, foliage (3 Credits)

PSB 418.2 Aquatic and Terrestrial Pollution Biology

Water as an environment physical properties of water. Thernal stratification, Biogelicyles of nutrients, -carbon, sulphur and phosphorus cycles. Algae as major primary producers in water. Classification of aquatic macrophytes, biological role of aquatic macrophytes in relation to water pollution, sources of water pollution —industrial effluents, sewage, crude oil pollution, agricultural, etc (3 Credits)

AEB 471.1 Fish Diseases and Parasites

Identification, morphology, taxonomy, life history of fish parasites. The ecological and pathological effects RCFE of parasites and diseases of fish. Epidemiology of parasitepopulations in water body, Common bacterial, fungal and viral diseases and their control. Other enemies of fish. International restrictions biding the transportation of fish across country boundaries. Fish ponds and public health (2 Credits).

AEB 472.1 Management of Coastal Systems Ornamental Fisheries & Fishing Gear Technology

Sustainable use of our Coastal resources. Effects of Climatic Changes on the Coastal ecosystem, erosion, sea water intrusion and flooding, Conservation Strategies, policies, national and international laws of the seas and Coastal regions. Ornamental fish breeding, nutrition and management. Design and management of aquaria. Study of types of gears and fishing crafts. As properties of the materials used/construction of traps and nets. Assessment ofefficiency of fishing gear. (3 Credits)

AEB 473.1 Fish Biology and Natural History

The gross external and internal anatomy ofa typical bony and typical cartilaginous fish. The different types of anatomical systems and basic functions of each system of organs in the fish embryology important fish e.g. Tilapia Clarias, and mullet. Ecology of fishes with special reference in distribution and natural history and obtaining maximum returns from fishery. resources. Characteristics of the aquatic environment, organic production in aquatic fauna and flora —algal blooms and eutrophicational plankton, and benthos, biomass assessment. Food and feeding habits of fishes, feed and habitat selection, population, niche concept, food chains. Reproductive behavior and life cycles of some selected species.

 

Electives:

AEB 475.1 Oceanography

Study of the temperature and chemistry of sea water. Biological activities and their distribution. Salinity. chiorinity currents, tides, waf  water. Distribution and behavior of plankton. Brackish water conditions and fauna. Interrelationship of, and physiological adaptations of marine organisms.

(3Credits)

AEB 474.1 Productivity of Natural & Man-made Water

Bodies

Energy flow in the ecosystems. Energy and the food chain. Biogeochemical cycle in the ecosystem. Measurement of productivity of community structure. (2 Credits)

AEB 476.2 Aquaculture & Fish Processing

Aims and types of aquaculture/Mariculture, history, Status of aquacuirure in Nigeria Principles of aquaculture; lining and pond fertilization, food supply, growth rate and food conversion, Selection of Culture Species, introduction of exotic Species and their implications. Stocking and harvesting practices, Economic Consideration of aquaculture Maintenance of public health aspects. Principles and methods of preservation, packing. Storage and quality Control. Traditional Versus modern preservation techniques (3 Credits)

Second Semester

AEB 477.2 Fish Population Dynamics and Modeling

Fishing effort and catch per effort. Population estimation, age and growth. Natality mortality. Computation yields from given recruitment. Stock assessment. (2 Credits)

AEB 478.2 Fisheries Policy and Management Practice

Fisheries institution. Conservation strategies policy and laws ofNigeria. International laws ofthe sea. (2 Credits)

 

Elective:

AEB 479.2 CLimatology and Biogeography

The principles, aims and scope of climatology and biogeography. The elements and controls of climate and weather and the dynamics of the earth’s atmosphere Radiation and heating of the atmospheric systems, atmospheric moisture, the dynamic of pressure and wind systems, condensation and precipitation processes, seasonal variation in temperature, day length, radiation, rainfall and evapo-transpiration. Equipment and maintenance of standard meterological stations. The tropical climate, relation

between climate and freshwater ecosystem. Some of pollution biology. Treatment of domestic and industrial sewage. (2 Credits)

 

PARASITOLOGY OPTION

AEB 430.1 Ecology, Taxonomy and Diagnoses of Parasites

Parasitism as an ecological relationship, host finding and selection; invasion mechanisms, site selection; habitat selection and habitat problems of parasites; behavioural aspects of parasite ecology. Systematic and Taxonomic diversity of parasites including Protozoan and helminthic parasites of veterinary and medical importance. Diagnosis, Pathology, Treatment and Control of Parasites infections. (3 Credits)

AEB 432.1 Epidemiology and Pathology

Scope and application of epidemiology, epidemiology methods, counting diseases, population and samples, epidemiological of findings, investigation of epidemics, application of epidemiological techniques. The concept of communitydiagnosis (CD)Community Diagnosis in practice. demography. vital statistics, socio-economic status, nutritional status, family health, the environment, use of health service, Tests and community diagnosis, use of CD in health service. Tests and community diagnosis, use of CD in health care planning and training programmes, drug abuse, accidents, (3 Credits)

AEB 433.1 Nematology

Soil and plant nematology. Ecology and bionornics of plant parasitic nematodes. Life, cycle morphology and mode of transmission of plant nematodes of vegetable and root crops in Nigeria Crop damage by nernatodes and food production in Nigeria. Control of nematode parasites of crops-chemical biological and cultural methods control methods. Case studies on specific vegetable and root crops. Soil and plant nematodes. Ecology and bionomics of plant parasitic nematodes. Crop damage. (3Credits)

 

Elective:

AEB 421.1 Management of Arthropod Pests in Human & Animal Healt

AEB 440.2 Applied Parasitology and Biochemistry of Parasites

Principles of applied parasitology, parasites and PHC programme, impact of socio-economic projects on parasite transmission. Human factors and human behabiour related transmission of parasites water, health and sanitation. Chemstherapy of parasites including principles, modes of action of antiprotozoal drugs and common anthelminthics. Physiology snf Biochemistry ofparasites. (3 Credits

AEB 441.2 Immunology and Immuno-Pathology

Effectors of Immunity, control of immunity, immunological tolerance, immunity and infectious disease!, immune-diagnosis of parasites infections, principles of immunopathology anaphylaxis, cytotoxicity, immune complex disorders, hypersensitivity reactions, allergies, immune-deficiency disease, auto-immune disorders (3 Credits)

 

 

CHEMISTRY COURSES

 

ACADEMIC STAFF OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  HANDLING CHEMISTRY EDUCATION STUDENTS

 

S/N

NAME

QUALIFICATION

AREA OF SPECIALIZATION

DESIGNATION

1.

Abia, A.A

B.Sc., B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Polymer  Chemistry

Professor

3.

Horsfall, M.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Analytical/Environmental Chemistry 

Professor

5.

Ogali,R.E.

B.Sc., M. Phil., Ph.D

Organic/Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Professor

6.

Okoye, I.P.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Petroleum Chemistry

Reader

7.

Ofodile, S.E.

B.Sc., Ph.D

Analytical Chemistry

Senior Lecturer

8.

Obuzor, G.U.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Polymer/Organometallics

Professor

9.

Ifeanecha, M.C.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Nutrition/ Toxicology

Senior Lecturer

10.

IbezimEzeani, M.U.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Physical Chemistry

Senior Lecturer

11.

James, A.O.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Inorganic/Corrosion Chemistry

Senior Lecturer 

12.

Osu, C.I.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Environmental Chemistry

Lecturer II

13.

Belonwu D.C.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Environmental Biochemistry

Lecturer II

14.

Achugasi, M. O.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Organic Chemistry

Assistant Lecturer

 

 

Professional staff in Department of Pure & Industrial Chemistry Handling Chemistry Education Students

S/NO

Names of Staff

Qualification

Designation/Option

Designation

  1.  

Okorika. Z. G.

BSSG. HD. HND

Glass blower

Chief Technologist

  1.  

Okike N.E

HD/IMT (Enugu), MNIST (Nigeria). B. Engr. (UPH)

Chemistry/Biochemistry

Chemical Engineering

Chief Technologist

  1.  

Oken. E.E.

FD (NIST) (UPH)

Chemistry/Biochemistry

Chief Technologist

  1.  

Ijente. P. E

FD (NIST) (UPH)

Chemistry/Biochemistry

Chief Technologist

  1.  

Ojenamah. U

HND (SLT). HND (NISLT) (UPH)

Chemistry/Biochemistry

Technologist 1

  1.  

Uchendu. S. C

HND (SLT). PGD  (Ind. Chemistry (FUTA)

Chemistry/Biochemistry

Technologist 11

 

Course offered by Chemistry Education Students

YEA    YEAR ONE FIRST SEMESTER                          

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 100.1

Communication Skills in English

3

2.

GES 102.1

Introduction to Philosophy  and Logic

2

3.

EDU 100.1

Introduction  to Education

2

 

EDU 101.1

Introduction to Teaching Profession

2

4.

EDU 103.1

Theory & Practice of Physical  Activity Skills & Techniques 1

1

5.

CHM 130.1

General Chemistry I

3

6.

FSB 101.1

General Biology I

3

7.

PHY 101.1

Mechanics and Properties of Matter

3

                    TOTAL

19

 

YEA    YEAR ONE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 101.2

Computer Appreciation & Application

3

2.

GES 103.2

Nigerian Peoples and Culture

2

3.

EDU 101.2

Instructional Technology

2

4.

EDU 103.2

Theory & Practice  of Physical Activity Skills & Technique II

1

5.

CHM 131.2

General  Chemistry II

3

6.

CHM 132.2

Intro. To Principles of Org. Chemistry

3

7.

FSB 102.2

General Biology II

3

                   TOTAL

17

 

YEA    YEAR TWO FIRST SEMESTER                         

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.1

Developmental Psychology

2

2.

EDU 201.1

History of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.1

Classroom Management

2

4.

EDU 2CS.1

Community Service

1

5.

CHM 250.1

Inorganic Chemistry

3

6.

CHM 260.1

Organic Chemistry I

3

7.

BCH 210.1

General Biochemistry I

3

                    TOTAL

16

 

                 YEAR TWO SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.2

Art of Teaching

3

2.

EDU 201.2

Foundation of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.2

Sociology of Education

2

4.

EDU 202.3

Micro-Teaching

1

5.

EDU 202.2

Element of Special Education

2

6.

EDU 204.2

Supervised Teaching Practice I

2

7.

CHM 240.2

Physical Chemistry I

3

8.

CHM 261.2

Organic Chemistry II

3

9.

ICH 270.2

Industrial Aspect of Chemistry

3

                   TOTAL

21

 

YEA    YEAR THREE FIRST SEMESTER                               

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 300.1

Curriculum Development and Instruction 

2

2.

EDU 301.1

Philosophy of Education

2

3.

EDU 302.1

Psychology of Learning

3

4.

EDU 303.1

Supervision and Leadership Behaviour in Education

2

5.

EDU 305.1

Education Technology

2

6.

CHM 340.1

Physical Chemistry II

3

7.

CHM 349.1

Chemical Kinetics

2

8.

CHM 350.1

Inorganic Chemistry II

3

9.

CHM 365.1

Structure & Reactivity in Inorganic Chemistry

3

10.

ICH 374.1

Intro. to Polymer Chemistry

3

                    TOTAL

25

 

                 YEAR THREE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 300.2

Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

2

2.

EDU 301.2

Methods Course in Discipline Area

2

3.

EDU 302.2

ICT in Education

2

4.

EDU 303.2

Research Methods and Statistics

3

5.

EDU 304.2

Supervised Teaching Practice II

4

6.

EDU 305.2

Lab. Org. & Management

3

7.

EDU 306.2

Media Systems

3

                   TOTAL

22

 

YEA        YEAR FOUR FIRST SEMESTER                                

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 400.1

Management in Education

2

2.

EDU 401.1

Test and Measurement

2

3.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

4.

EDU 402.1

Computer in Education

2

5.

CHM 440.1

Physical Chemistry III

3

6.

CHM 442.1

Electrochemistry

3

7.

CHM 450.1

Inorganic Chemistry III

3

                    TOTAL

19

 

               YEAR FOUR SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

2.

EDU 402.2

Guidance and Counselling

2

3.

EDU 404.2

Comparative Education

2

4.

EDU 405.2

Continuous Assessment

2

5.

CHM 461.2

Organic Synthesis

3

 

ANY 3 ELECTIVE COURSES (6 CREDITS)

 

6.

CHM 445.2

Photo Chemistry

2

7.

CHM 447.2

Statistical Thermodynamics

2

8.

CHM 448.2

Group Theory of Symmetry

2

9.

CHM 451.2

X-Ray Refraction

2

10.

CHM 452.2

Alloy Chemistry

2

11.

CHM 453.2

Organometallic Chemistry

2

12.

CHM 462.2

Pharmaceutical Chemistry

2

                   TOTAL

19

:

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR EDUCATION COURSES HOUSED IN THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION/DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM STUDEIS AND EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

 

EDU 100.1: Introduction to Education (1 Unit)

This course presents a general introduction to Education as a discipline and as a profession. Students will be introduced to the scope of education, its roles in society and why teachers study education. Added to this, the course will introduce students to knowledge of specialized areas in education. These include Educational Management, Psychology, Guidance and Counseling and Foundations, Educational awareness of their interrelationships and importance.

EDU 101.2: Instructional Technology (2 Units)

This course exposes students to the different misconceptions of the field of educational technology. This is followed by modern definition of educational technology. The course presents the different classes of audiovisual materials and their production, to produce/improvise and audiovisual material for use during teaching practice.

EDU 200.2: Art of Teaching (2 Units)

This course is supposed to develop teacher’s competence in school pedagogy. It explores the teaching process in relation to the purpose of education, human growth and personality, the nature of learning, the dynamics of groups, the nature of subject matter and evaluation. The course will provide opportunity for stimulated microteaching.

EDU 2CS.1: Community Service (1 Unit)

This is a community-based practical exercise in which students will develop curriculum packages to solve societal problems. This will take the form of workshops at community halls, village squares etc. It will also entail developing training packages for illiterate skilled and unskilled craftsmen in both urban and rural settings.

EDU 300.1: Curriculum Development and Instruction (2 Units)

This is a basic course, which exposes students to curriculum development models, patterns of curriculum organization, sequencing of curriculum content. The course system will lay emphasis on how to produce relevant curriculum for the 9-3-4 system of education in Nigeria. The relationship between evaluation and effective curriculum development will be explicated.

EDU 301.2: Method Course (2 Units)

The course is designed to expose teachers to the various teaching methods. The characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of each method will be explored. The concept of individualizationof instruction as an innovative teaching approach will be presented. Different individualized teaching strategies will also be presented. Efforts will be geared towards producing a highly purposeful and self-directed learner and to turn a teacher from being a dispenser of information to a facilitator of learning.

EDU 303.2: Basic Statistics and Research Methods (3 Units)

The course is designed to acquaint students with the nature and scope of statistics. It covers basic descriptive statistics-data collection, measures of frequency distribution, central tendency and dispersion. Students are introduced to inferential statistics – parametric and non-parametric tests as a means for scientific study. Introduction to research – definitions and values. Types of research, descriptive, experimental, quasi-experimental, phenomenology etc. and steps in conducting research, problem formulation, methodology and data analysis and reporting. Documentation in research – various formats: Harvard citation, Vancouver (numbering) and American Psychological Association (APA) style will be presented.

EDU 305.2: Laboratory Organization and Management (1 Unit)

Shortage and handling of chemicals care, use and maintenance of basic laboratory equipment e.g balance, microscope, electrical meters, batteries etc. handling of glassware, purification of water by distillation – management of practice class. Management of a Laboratory store – taking inventory, issuance of materials, retrieval of materials and safety in the laboratory.

EDU306.2: Media Systems

This course exposes students to modern information Technology gadgets as they apply to classroom instruction. This course will emphasize the process approach to instructional development and the integration of appropriate media materials.

EDU 401.2: Computer in Education (2 Units)

Curriculum specialists can no longer ignore the impact of computer technology in this 21st century. To overcome the problems inherent in being computer illiterate, this course will expose students to the rudiments of computer literacy. Students will be exposed to the use of application software, the internet, and the application of the principles of information and communication technology to education.

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR COURSES OFFERED BY CHEMISTRY EDUCATION OPTION HOUSED IN THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE / DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY.

CHM 131.2 General Chemistry II

Application of the principles of chemical and physical change to the study of the behaviour of matter and the interaction between matter. Course content includes chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, acids and bases, the chemistry of the representative elements and their common compounds with emphasis on graduation of their properties, brief chemistry of the first series of transition elements, general principles of extraction of metals; introductory nuclear chemistry.

CHM 132.2 Introduction to Principles of Organic Chemistry

A survey of carbon compounds including an overview of the common functional groups in aliphatic and benzenoid compounds. Introduction to reactants and reactions in Organic Chemistry.

CHM 235.1 Analytical Chemistry I

Introduction to basic analytical chemistry. Concepts of qualitative and quantitative analysis. Sampling methods: representative, honiogenous/heterogeneous. The theory of errors: types of errors instrumental and personal errors, sources and prevention, determinate and indeterminate errors. Statistical treatment of data: significant figure, mean, mode, accuracy, precision, standard deviation relative error, student t-tests, Q-test, F-test, confidence level correlation and regression analysis calibration curves. Gravinietric analysis, concept of ligands and chelation. Volumetric analysis: acidimetry and alkalimetry, acid-base indicators, primary standards, precipitation and redox titrations, applications of volumetric analysis, balancing of equations. Introduction to electroanalytical methods: e lectrogravimetry and coulometry.

CHM 240.2 Physical Chemistry I

Introduction to basic physical chemistry. The emphasis is on the properties of gases, the three laws of thermodynamics and the principles of chemical kinetics CHM 250.1 Inorganic Chemistry I

The- physical principles of Inorganic Chemistry are treated. Topics ii chemistry of non-transition elements and alloy chemistry.

CHM 260.1 Organic Chemistry I

Fundamental theories and principles of chemical reactivity. Chemical and synthesis of monofunctional compounds. Reaction and mechani common reactions, stereochemistry.

CHM 261.2 Organic Chemistry II

Chemistry of difunctional compounds: Dienes, allenes, diols, diketones dialdehydes, etc. Chemistry of aromatic compounds. Aromaticity and route polymer aromatic compounds.

ICH 236.2 Process Cãlcnlatkns in Chemistry

Data reduction and special functions in chemistry. Units and dimens. stoichiometric and composition relations. Material and energy bal calculations in chemical reactions and processes.

ICH 270.2 Industrial Aspects of Chemistry

Overview of chemical processes and products with emphasis on the nal origin and applications of the products of the chemical and allied industries.

CHM 335.1 Analytical Chemistry II

Introduction to electroanalytical methods: coulometry, conductom voltametry, polarograghy, amperoinetry and potentiometry; concepts analytical applications in titrations; methods in electrophor Coniplexometric titrations: concepts of ligands, EDTA titration, direct indirect titrations, metal ion indicators. Introduction to spectroanaly methods: uv-visible colorimetry, infra-red, atomic absorption and flame emission spectrometry. Beer-Lambert’s law, methods of quantitative anal involving this law.

CHM 340.1 Physical Chemistry II

Chemical thermodynamics including treatment of partial molar quantities chemical potentials. Brief introduction to quantum mechanics; limitE mechanics and derivation/application. Physical significance. Atomic structure.

CHM 349.1 Chemical Kinetics

Theories of reaction rates, interpretation of kinetic data. Kinetics of reactiom surface reactions, experimental methods, mechanism, chain reactions and gas phase reactions.

CHM 350.1 Inorganic Chemistry ll

Detailed study of the chemistry of the transition (d-block) elements to highlight their industrial uses. Introduction to alloy chemistry and the chemistry of coordination compounds.

CHM 361.1 Heterocyclic and Carbocyclic Chemistry

Preparation and properties of heterocyclic compounds; compounds with linked aromatic rings; 3,4,5, and 6 membered ring carbocyclic compounds.

CHM 362.1 Applied Spectroscopy

Principles and applications of IR, UV NMR and mass spectroscopy, the determination and elucidation of structures of organic compounds.

CHM 365.1 Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

Stereochemistry, kinetics and mechanism of organic reactions; reactive intermediates. Theory of organic chemistry.

1CH 371.1 Process Chemistry l

Heat generation and transfer in industrial chemical operations. Laboratory techniques contrasted with methods used in a large industrial scale.

ICH 374.1 Introduction to Polymer Chemistry

The nature of macromolecules, Outline of sources of raw-materials for polymers. Polymerization processes and conditions. Kinetics of polymerization process. Copolyrnerization. Polymer reactions. Molecular weight determination. Analysis and testing of polymers. Concepts of thermoplastic and thermoset polymers, polymer utilization, functionality of monomers, structure-reactivity relationship, auto-acceleration and polymerization conditions.

CHM 435.1 Analytical Chemistry III

Separation techniques: solvent extraction, liquid-liquid extraction, theoretical concepts and application in analysis. The different types of chromatograp paper, thin-layer, column, gas and high performance liquid (HPI chromatography. Concepts of theoretical plates, resolution Van Deemter equation; application in analysis. Spectral methods of analysis: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR (1Hand 13C), X-ray fluorescence technique. Mass spectrornetry: instrumentation, fragmentat pattern, use of Baynon’s table, cleavage patterns in alkanes, alkenes, aromat alcohols, carbonyls, etc. Radiochemical methods: concepts of radioactivity nuclear stability and decay patterns, detectors, law of radioactivity, application in chemical and biological tracers, isotopic dilations, nuclear activation techniques. Electron spin resonance spectrometry. Thermo-analytical techniques: factors affecting thermos-analytical results, types of thermos analytical methods, thermometric titrations

CHM 436.1 Environmental Chemistry

The crucial link between chemical principles and natural environment will stressed. Air and water pollutions: their characteristics and methods of cont Water chemistry and water pollution, Water treatment methods. Soil and 1 pollution, Noise pollution and aspect of solid waste management
CHM 442.1: Electrochemistry 

Equilibria in electrochenical cells, thermodynamics of electrochemical cells, solution electrolytes, ionic strength, Debye-Huckel Theory), transport members, conductance and equilibria, Fick’s laws, electrodics.

CHM 445 2 Phochemxstry

Interaction of radiation with matter, electronic excitation and selection rules Laws of photochemistry quantum yields, photosensitization, luminescence quenching photochemistry of the atmosphere, and chemical actinumetry.

CHM 447.2 Statistical Thermodynamics

Microstate and randomness, probability distribution functions, the molecular partition function thermodynamic qualities of ideal gases, statistical thermodynamics of monatomic solids

CHM 448.2 Group Theory and Symmetry

Symmetry elements and symmetry operations, molecular symmetry groups and group properties, schoenflies symmetry of point Group classification, mathematical structure of groups, applications of symnietry in chemistry, block orbitals for infinite system.

CHM 450.1 Inorganic Chemistry III

Chemistry of lanthanides and actinides, electron deficient compounds. Born compounds and metal carbonyls.

CHM 451.2 X-ray Diffraction

Types of solids, Bravaris lattices, miller indices, indexing of diffraction patterns for cubic crystals, Debye-scherer and x-ray diffractometer method for studying inorganic compounds.

CHM 452.2 Alloy Chemistry

Basic principles of alloy chemistry, alloy preparation, types and phase changes in alloys importance of alloy additions to elements, phase diagrams of some industrial alloys and their uses.

CHM 453.2 Organometallic Chemistry

Classification of organometallic compounds, preparation, structure am reactions of organometallic compounds, synthetic utility of organometalli compounds of transition metals, their reactions and structure. The role o organometallic compounds in some catalytic reactions. -

CHM 460.1 Natural Products Chemistry

Chemistry of terpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, antibiotics,’ flavonoids prostagladins. Other natural products of pharmaceutical importance. Genera methods of isolation, separation, purification and structural determination of the natural products. Classifications. Discussion of chemistry of important members. Biogenesis.

CHM 461.2 Organic Synthesis

Philosophy and theory of organic synthesis. Functionalization and interconversion of functional groups. Formation of C-C, CC, and CC bonds

Formation of C-heteroatorn bonds. Ring formation, expansion and contraction

Asymmetric synthesis.

CHM 462.2 Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Physicochemical properties in relation to biological activity. General drug metabolism. Medicinal chemistry of some selected classes of compounds Including their synthesis: steroids (including steroidal hormones) and vitamins Analgesic (antipyretic and narcotic). Local anaesthetics. Chemotherapeuti agents, e.g. sulphonamides, penicillins, antimalarial and anthelmintics Phannaceutical analysis and quality control procedures.

ICH 471.2 Process Chemistry III

Conservation of mass, energy and momentum in ideal reactors. Material ii isothermal reactors for homogenous reactions. Conversion in single isothermal reactors. Multiple isothennal rector system. No isothermal reactors. Automat reactions.

Industrial organic and inorganic materials, raw materials, technical am economic principles of processes and products routes. Flow diagrams.

ICH 472.1 Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry

The physical chemistry of surface and interfaces with emphasis on industrial

applocations. The properties of colloid and micelles. Distillation processes

Industrial catalysis, phase diagram.

ICH 474.1 Polymer Technology

Structure and properties of bulk polymers: crystalline melting paint (TM), glass transition temperature (Tg), crysialIization in ‘polymers, crystallization. Plasticization and its effects onp ymer properties. Polymer property requirements and utilization. Polymprocessing: plasticscompjcssion, injection, blow, extrusion and transfer moulding, Rubber and fiber processing, polymer additives.

ICH 476.1 Process Chemistry II

Vapour liquid equilibrium relations single-stage distillation methods, graphics multistage calculations fractional dIaóio1vent extraction

ICH 477.1 Mineral Processing I

Importance of mineral processing and metalluigy. Mineral concentration including chemical ore processing, oi makings, steel making, foundry technology, fabrication techniques. :A

ICH 477.2 Mineral Processing/Metallurgy

Solidification of liquid metals. Heat treatment processes, metallography techniques. Metallurgical microscopes.

ICH 478.1 Chemistry of Paints and Adhesives.

Surface coating terminologies, definitions/nomenclature. Constituents of paints, varnishes and lacquers. Binders (film formers) - convertible and non-convertible binders, pigments and extenders, solvents for surface coatings. Paint additives. Paint formulation and manufacture. Film properties and measurements. Classification of adhesives, choice of adhesives, theories of adhesion. Adhesive formulations and bonding techniques. Test methods and their significance.

ICH 480.1 Petroleum Chemistry

Physical and chemistry characteristics of crude oil, chemistry of petroleum refining catalytic cracking, alkylation, polymerization, etc. Current petroleum use, future of petroleum.

ICH 480.2 Petrochemicals

The chemistry of processes involved in the conversion of natural gas and petroleum hydrocarbon to industrial chemicals. Utilization of olefins for

industrial chemicals. Chemicals from benzene, toluene and xylenes. Nylon intermediates.

ICH 481.2 Corrosion Chemistry

Principles and theory of corrosion, kinetics and thermodynamics, aqueous, dry and bacterial corrosion. Their prevention.

ICH 482.2 Colour Chemistry

The chemistry and theory of dyeing. Chemistry and application of reactive dyes Preparation and dyeing of man-made fibres. Printing. Colour matters for food

drugs and cosmetics. Dyes used in paper industries and colour photograph.

 

PHYSICS COURSES

FOR PHYSICS EDUCATION:

S/N

NAME

QUALIFICATION

AREA OF SPECIALIZATION

DESIGNATION

1.

Abumere, O.E.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Solid State Physics/Electronics

Professor

2.

Avwiri, G.O.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Electronics/Environmental Physics

Professor

3.

Owate, I.O.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Applied Physics (Electronics/Materials)

Professor & HOD

4.

Ekine, A.S.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Applied Geophysics

Professor

5.

Chukwuocha, E.O.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Theoretical Physics (MHD floes)

Senior Lecturer 

6.

Chad-Umoren, Y.E.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Nuclear Physics

Senior Lecturer

7.

Nte, F.U.

B.Sc., PGD., M.Sc., Ph.D

Environmental Physics

Senior Lecturer

8.

Sofolabo, A.O.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Exploration/Applied Geophysics

Lecturer I

9.

Nwankwo, C.N.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Applied Geophysics

Lecturer I

10

Enyinna, P.I.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Environmental Physics

Lecturer I

11.

Emujakporue, G.

B. Tech., M.Tech

Applied Geophysics

Lecturer I

12.

Ngwueke, M.I.

B.Sc ., M.Sc., Ph.D

Theoretical Physics

Lecturer I

13.

Onwunema, S.E.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Theoretical Physics

Lecturer II

14.

Onovughe, E.V.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Materials Science

Lecturer II

 

 

Professional staff in Department of Physics HANDLING PYSICS EDUCATION STUDENTS

S/NO

Names of Staff

Qualification

Designation

Field of Specialization

  1.  

Dukobo. TG.

HND. (NIST) FIN. DIP. (NIST). INTELNP. NIST. WAEC. FSLC

Chief Technologist

Physics/Electronics

  1.  

Elenwo. P.O.

SSCE. ND (NIST), HND, B. Tech, M.Sc

Asst. Chief Tech

Instrumentation/Material Science

  1.  

Akenzua. O.S

B. Eng in View, ND, ND WAEC

Principal Tech

Geophysics

  1.  

Ishiekwene, M.

B. Tech, HND, OND & SSCE

Senior Tech

Physics/Electronics

  1.  

Nwachuwu. C.U.

SSCE. BTC (NIST) ND

Senior Tech

Physics/Electronics

  1.  

Nwamanda. O.E

WASC. BTC. OND HND

Senior Tech

Physics/Electronics

  1.  

Ogbonna. B.O

WAEC, B. TECH. M.ENG (MNSE)

Technologist 1

Electrical System and Machine

  1.  

Deeyor, Baridi

SSCE, B. Tech

Technologist 11

Physics/Electronics

  1.  

Egbo C. Collins

SSCE. OND. (NIST), HND (NIST), BSc

Technologist 11

Geophysics

  1.  

Herbert-Paul, joy

SSCE, OND, HND, (NIST)

Technologist 11

Physics/Electronics

  1.  

Ekeh, Emmanuel Chijioke

SSCE, BTECH (Phy/Electronics)

Technologist 11

Physics/Electronics

  1.  

Odike, Odike C.

SSCE, NREP, HSC level (1,2,3), B. TECH

Technologist 11

Physics/production

 

 

 

 

 

Course offered by Physics Education Students

 

YEA    YEAR ONE FIRST SEMESTER                          

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 100.1

Communication Skills in English

3

2.

GES 102.1

Introduction to Philosophy  and Logic

2

3.

EDU 100.1

Introduction  to Education

2

 

EDU 101.1

Introduction to Teaching Profession

2

4.

EDU 103.1

Theory & Practice of Physical  Activity Skills & Techniques 1

1

5.

PHY 101.1

Mechanics and Properties of Matter

3

6.

PHY 102.1

Lab Practice I

1

7.

MTH 110.1

Algebra and Trigonometry

3

8.

MTH 120.1

Calculus

3

                    TOTAL

20

 

YEA    YEAR ONE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 101.2

Computer Appreciation & Application

3

2.

GES 103.2

Nigerian Peoples and Culture

2

3.

EDU 101.2

Instructional Technology

2

4.

EDU 103.2

Theory & Practice  of Physical Activity Skills & Technique II

1

5.

PHY 103.2

Lab Practice II

1

6.

PHY 112.2

Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism

3

7.

PHY 115.2

Light, Sound and Heat

3

                   TOTAL

15

 

YEA    R TWO FIRST SEMESTER                         

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.1

Developmental Psychology

2

2.

EDU 201.1

History of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.1

Classroom Management

2

4.

EDU 2CS.1

Community Service

1

5.

PHY 206.1

Lab Practice III

1

6.

PHY 216.1

Vibration and Waves

3

7.

PHY 231.1

Modern Physics

2

8.

MTH 210.1

Linear Algebra

3

                    TOTAL

16

 

                YEAR TWO SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.2

Art of Teaching

3

2.

EDU 201.2

Foundation of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.2

Sociology of Education

2

4.

EDU 202.3

Micro-Teaching

1

5.

EDU 202.2

Element of Special Education

2

6.

EDU 204.2

Supervised Teaching Practice I

2

7.

PHY 200.2

Energy and Environment

2

8.

PHY 207.2

Lab Practice IV

1

9.

PHY 211.2

Quantum Mechanics

3

10.

PHY 222.2

Theoretical & Fluid Mechanics I

2

                   TOTAL

20

    YEAR THREE FIRST SEMESTER                      

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 300.1

Curriculum Development and Instruction

2

2.

EDU 301.1

Philosophy of Education

2

3.

EDU 302.1

Psychology of Learning

3

4.

EDU 303.1

Supervision and Leadership Behavior in Education

2

5.

EDU 305.1

Educational Technology

2

6.

PHY 306.1

Thermal Physics

3

7.

PHY 313.1

Electricity and Magnetism I

3

8.

PHY 331.1

Quantum Mechanics II

3

9.

PHY 351.1

Electronics

2

                    TOTAL

22

 

                 YEAR THREE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 300.2

Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

2

2.

EDU 301.2

Methods Courses in Discipline Area

2

3.

EDU 302.2

ICT in Education

2

4.

EDU 303.2

Research Methods and Statistics

3

5.

EDU 304.2

Supervised Teaching Practice II

4

6.

EDU 305.2

Lab. Org. & Management

3

7.

EDU 306.2

Media Systems

3

                   TOTAL

19

 

YEA        YEAR FOUR FIRST SEMESTER                       

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 400.1

Management in Education

2

2.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

3.

EDU 401.1

Test and Measurement

2

4.

EDU 402.1

Computer in Education

2

5.

PHY 409.1

Physical Optics

3

6.

PHY 414.1

Electricity & Magnetism II

2

7.

PHY 442.1

Solid State Physics I

3

8.

PHY 452.1

Electronics I

3

                    TOTAL

21

 

YEA        YEAR FOUR SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

2.

EDU 402.2

Guidance and Counselling

2

3.

EDU 404.2

Comparative Education

2

4.

EDU 405.2

Continuous Assessment

2

5.

PHY 434.2

Atomic & Nuclear Physics

3

6.

PHY 443.2

Solid State Physics II

3

7.

PHY 454.2

Micro Waves

3

                   TOTAL

19

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR EDUCATION COURSES HOUSED IN THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION/DEPARTMENT

EDU 100.1: Introduction to Education (1 Unit)

This course presents a general introduction to Education as a discipline and as a profession. Students will be introduced to the scope of education, its roles in society and why teachers study education. Added to this, the course will introduce students to knowledge of specialized areas in education. These include Educational Management, Psychology, Guidance and Counseling and Foundations, Educational awareness of their interrelationships and importance.

EDU 101.2: Instructional Technology (2 Units)

This course exposes students to the different misconceptions of the field of educational technology. This is followed by modern definition of educational technology. The course presents the different classes of audiovisual materials and their production, to produce/improvise and audiovisual material for use during teaching practice.

EDU 200.2: Art of Teaching (2 Units)

This course is supposed to develop teacher’s competence in school pedagogy. It explores the teaching process in relation to the purpose of education, human growth and personality, the nature of learning, the dynamics of groups, the nature of subject matter and evaluation. The course will provide opportunity for stimulated microteaching.

EDU 2CS.1: Community Service (1 Unit)

This is a community-based practical exercise in which students will develop curriculum packages to solve societal problems. This will take the form of workshops at community halls, village squares etc. It will also entail developing training packages for illiterate skilled and unskilled craftsmen in both urban and rural settings.

EDU 300.1: Curriculum Development and Instruction (2 Units)

This is a basic course, which exposes students to curriculum development models, patterns of curriculum organization, sequencing of curriculum content. The course system will lay emphasis on how to produce relevant curriculum for the 9-3-4 system of education in Nigeria. The relationship between evaluation and effective curriculum development will be explicated.

EDU 301.2: Method Course (2 Units)

The course is designed to expose teachers to the various teaching methods. The characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of each method will be explored. The concept of individualizationof instruction as an innovative teaching approach will be presented. Different individualized teaching strategies will also be presented. Efforts will be geared towards producing a highly purposeful and self-directed learner and to turn a teacher from being a dispenser of information to a facilitator of learning.

EDU 303.2: Basic Statistics and Research Methods (3 Units)

The course is designed to acquaint students with the nature and scope of statistics. It covers basic descriptive statistics-data collection, measures of frequency distribution, central tendency and dispersion. Students are introduced to inferential statistics – parametric and non-parametric tests as a means for scientific study. Introduction to research – definitions and values.Types of research, descriptive, experimental, quasi-experimental, phenomenology etc. and steps in conducting research, problem formulation, methodology and data analysis and reporting. Documentation in research – various formats: Harvard citation, Vancouver (numbering) and American Psychological Association (APA) style will be presented.

EDU 305.2: Laboratory Organization and Management (1 Unit)

Shortage and handling of chemicals care, use and maintenance of basic laboratory equipment e.g balance, microscope, electrical meters, batteries etc. handling of glassware, purification of water by distillation – management of practice class. Management of a Laboratory store – taking inventory, issuance of materials, retrieval of materials and safety in the laboratory.

EDU306.2: Media Systems

This course exposes students to modern information Technology gadgets as they apply to classroom instruction. This course will emphasize the process approach to instructional development and the integration of appropriate media materials.

EDU 401.2: Computer in Education (2 Units)

Curriculum specialists can no longer ignore the impact of computer technology in this 21st century. To overcome the problems inherent in being computer illiterate, this course will expose students to the rudiments of computer literacy. Students will be exposed to the use of application software, the internet, and the application of the principles of information and communication technology to education.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR COURSES OFERED BY PHYSICS EDUCATION OPTION HOUSED IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS,FACULTY OF SCIENCE

PHY 101.1 Introductions of Mechanics and Properties of Matter

Topics covered in this course will include the following: Motion in one dimension, motion in plane, work and energy, conservation laws, collision, solid friction, rotational kinematics and rotational dynamics, equilibrium, of rigid bodies, oscillations, gravitation, fluid statics and fluid dynamics. Surface Tension, Viscosity and Hydrostatics.

PHYIO2.1: Laboratory practical

This course emphasizes experimental verification and qiantitative measurements of physics laws, treatment of measurements rrors and graphicai analysis. The experiments include studies of mechanical systems, static and rotational dynamics of rigid bodies, viscosity, elasticity, surface tension and hydrostatics.

MTH 110.1.Algebra and Trigonometry

Elementary notations of set, subsets, unions, intersection, compliments, Venn diagrams. Real numbers, integers, rational and irrational numbers, mappings of a set. Real functions and their decomposition. Quadratic functions. Cubic functions. Roots of quadratic and cubic functions. Equations with complex roots. Complex number. Geometric representation of complex numbers. De Moirvers series and sequences. Principle of Mathematical Induction. Binomial theorem. Trigonometric function of angles. Circular functions. Addition theorems, Double and half angles.

MTH 120.1 Calculus

The straight line parallel and perpendicular lines angle between two straight line, the distance of points from a line, parametric equations, tangents and normals, limits and continuity. Differentiability, the derivative of simple algebraic functions, rules of differentiation, maxima and minima, integration as the inverse of differentiation. Integration as the limit ofa sum, area underthe curves, volumes.

GES 100.1 Communication Skill in English

The course seeks to develop the students a well-informed attitude to the English language and to equip them with the knowledge of English communication and study skill that will facilitate their work in University and beyond.

GES 102.1 Introduction to Logic and Philosophy

A brief survey of the scope, notions, branches and problems of philosophy symbolic logic, specific symbolic logic. Conjunction, affirmation, negations, disjunction, equivalence and conditional statements. Law of thought. The method of deduction, using rule of inference and bi-conditions. Quantitative theory.

GES 103.2 Nigeria Peoples & Culture

The overall objective of this course is to help students understand the concept of culture and its relevance to human society especially as it relates to development. In more specific terms, the course will be designed to help the students know the history of various Nigerian cultures beginning with pre-colonial Nigeria society. Colonialism constitutes a vital watershed in Nigerian history. Thus the course will identify the influence of colonialism on Nigerian culture, and focus 01 contemporary Nigerian culture explaining issues that relate to the political economic, educational, religious and social institutions in the nation. The course outline includes the concept of culture; pre-colonial culture and languages of Nigeria; principles of kinship, descent an in Nigerian culture; the colonial impact; Nigerian economic education and development in Nigeria; religion in Nigeria culture, environment and health practices in Niger relations.

PHY 103.2 Laboratory Practice II

The experiment carried out in this course will cover areas discussed in PHY 112.2. These experiments include verifications of the current electricity, measurement of the electrical properties of conductors, D.C. and A.C. circuit properties, series and parallel resonant circuits, transformer characteristics and other electrical circuit problems.

PHY 112.2 Introductions to Electricity and Magnetism

This is the introductory course on Electricity and Magnetism. Topics covered all will include: the Electric field, Gauss’s Law, Electric potential, Capacitor and Dielectric, current and resistance, electromotive force and circuits, the magnetic field, Ampere’s Law, faraday’s Law of induction.

Text: Electromagnetism and Modern Physics for physical Science by Evwaraye and Mgbenu.

PHY 115.2: Heat, Light and Optics

This course is designed for students in the Biological Sciences (Botany, Microbiology and Zoology). Topics to be covered in the course will include: thermometry, calorimetry and heat transfer. Geometrical optics will include reflection and refraction of light at the plane and curved surfaces and optical instruments. Properties and propagation of sound waves. Sound waves propagating in air columns. Doppler Effect.

PHY2O6.1: Laboratory Practice III

The laboratory course/consists of experiments drawn from electromagnetism and modern physics. Such experiments will include: measurement of specific charge, verification of the Hall effect, electron motion in electric and magnetic fields; experiments with the Geiger Mueller tube; the Frank-Hertz experiment and the Photo-electric effect.

PHY 216.1: Vibrations and Waves

This course is an introduction to oscillations and waves phenomena. Topics covered will include vibrations and waves, electromagnetism waves, vibrating systems, types of waves, sound waves and wave optics.

MTH 210.1: Linear Algebra

Definition of a function, sequences and series of real numbers, theory of functions of single variable.

MTH 280.1: Introduction to Computer Programming

Historical details of Computers, principles of programming. Programming with FORTRAN Language.

PHY2O7.2: Laboratory Practice

This laboratory course will include calorimery and heat transfer experiments. Light interference and diffraction experiments, experiments with Michelson interferometer, Fresnel Biprism, Nicol prism, Polari meter and the Newton’s Ring experiment.

PHY 211.2: Quantum Mechanics I

Inadequacies of classical mechanics, differences between classical I and quantum mechanics; wave-particle properties, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principles, wave and state functions; principles of Quantum mechanics: Schrodinger’s wave mechanics formulation, postulates of quantum mechanics, matrix representation of Quantum mechanics, time-independent Schrodinger’s wave equation; wave mechanics for some simple system;

PHY 222.2 Theoretical and Fluid Mechanics I

Newtonian Mechanics. Motion of a particle in one, two and three dimension, system of particles and collision theory, Newtonian gravitation, conservative forces and potentials, oscillations, central force problems, accelerated frames of reference, rigid body dynamics, generated motions; mechanics of continuum media. Fluid statics and dynamics.

PHY 231.2: Modern Physics

This is an introductory course on modern physics. Topic in atomic structure, photoelectric effect, black-body radiation, relativity, radioactivity, nuclear structure, mass spectrometers.

MTH 340.1 Ordinary Differential Equation I

Series solutions of second order linear equations. Bessel, Legendre and hypergeometric equations and functions. Gamma, Beta Functions. Stum-Lioville problems. Orthogonal polynomials and functions. Fourier, formier-Bessel and form, Legendre series. Fourier transformations. Solution of Laplace, wave and heat equation by Fourier method.

PHY 300.1 Mathematics Physics II

This is a continuation of the first semester PHY 200.1. Topics covered in the course will include complex variables and application; Fourier series and transforms, Metric’s and determinants; special functions like Bessel functions, Languere functions and polynomials; Hermite functiosn and polynomials; Lengendre equations and polynomials.

PHY 306.1 Thermal Physics

This course aims at presenting thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in a unified manner. Topics include quantum states, entropy, temperature, pressure, chemical potential, thermodynamics potential, grand sum and partition functions; distribution function, relationship of statistical variables of thermodynamic variables, applications, transport processes and fluctuation phenomenon. Maxwelt-Boltzman velocity distribution law

PHY 313.1 Electricity and Magnetism I

This course deals with the topics of electricity and magnetism seen in

PHY 315.1 Electronic Instrumentation I

Introduction to the principles of measurement and control. Generalized approach to measuring systems. (Functional description, input-output configuration). Performance characteristics of instruments. Analysis of errors, units of measurements. Analytical techniques for system analysis. (Different domain, Review of Laplace transform, transfer function). Frequency response analysis, Rouith-Huwite stability criteria, Poles-zero plots. Bode plots and polar plots. Nyquist stability and prinoiples and properties of feedback systems as applied to measurement systems. Control systems characteristics open and closed loop control systems.

PHY322.1 Theoretical and Fluid Mechanics II

Degrees of freedom, generalized coordinates, Lagrange’s formulation of mechanics, application, the calculus of variations and the action principle Hamiltonian’s formulation of mechanics, application. Invariance and conservation laws. Oscillatory systems including damped, forced and coupled oscillation, Normal modes.

PHY 331.1 Quantum Mechanics II

Degenerate and non-degenerate steady state permutation theory, identical particles, the matrix formulation of Quantum mechanics, Time- dependent perturbation theory, the relativistic wave equation, origin of the electron spin.

PHY353.1 Electrical Circuit

This course introduces students to the application of various methods of analyzing DC circuits cooking resistive elements and different types of sources (CC, CVS, CDCS, VDCS, CD’LS, VDVS), such as Kirchow’s Law, Node method, Mesh method, superposition, theorems and Norton equivalent circuits and maximum power transfer theorems and application to transistor and Op-amp circuits.

CCS — Constant current sources

CVS — Constant voltage sources

CDCS — Current Dependent current sources

VDCS _Voltage-Dependent current sources

CDVS — Current-Dependent voltage Sources.

PHY444.1 Engineering Materials1

Introduction of Material Science with emphasis on physical metallurgy, Classes of Materials, Polymers, ceramics, woods, metals and composite materials, structure, properties and applications of polymers, ceramics and metal. Effects of crystal structures, defects and heat- treatment on materials. Relation of properties (Electrical, optical and mechanical) to microstructure. Recovery, recrystallization and grain growth. Phase diagrams, Solidification of liquid metals and alloys, casting process defects. Cold and hot working processes(pressing forging, extrusion deep drawing, rolling, casting, etc.). Metallography Optical microscope and introduction to electron microscopy.

PHY 361.1 Introduction to Geophysical Exploration Seismic Methods

This course introduces the students to the art of Geophysical exploration using seismic methods. At the end of the course, the student should have mastered theoretical aspects of seismic methods, including characteristics of elastic waves and their propagation. Reflection, Refraction, Generation of seismic waves, Instruments, Digital recording and Field Instrumentation.

PHY 414.2: Electricity and Magnetism II

Continuation of PHY 313.1. Topics include polarization, dispersion, reflection and refraction of EM. Waves guided waves, radiating systems resonance cavities transmission lines, diffraction and electrodynamics.

PHY 32O.1: Advanced Physics Laboratory/Workshop (For Physics student)

In the course, laboratory experiments are chosen from electronics material science, atomic and nuclear, solid state physics and the workshop course is intended to prepare the students for their research projects (PHY 449.0) by way of introducing them to the use of simple machine tools. Welding, soldering glass blowing, engineering drawing and design are also included

PHY 345.2 Material Science

This course aims at acquainting Materials science students with the introduction to material based on properties of solids, microstructure forming and shaping operation. This should illustrate the importance o the range of currently available engineering materials and to show that technology development depends on (a) introducing new materials and new processes (b) awareness of limitations of existing materials and processes. Topics include:

Basic unit of atoms and molecule and how materials are formed from the basic units. Atomic and atomic coordination, atomic order in solids and molecular disorder, single-phase materials and molecular phases, ceramic polymer materials, conducting materials, magnetic and electrical materials, phase diagrams, processing and development of microstructure/composites. Performance of materials and devices. Designing with different materials, performance criteria and standards. Selected case studies of material selection.

PHY346.1 Advanced Materials Science Laboratory (For Material Science Students)

This course is designed to introduce the students with specialization in material Science to basic principles of experimentation using different types of materials. Simple experiments that show how materials behave under different environmental exposures will be carried out. Visits to materials industries and Engineering materials workshop is a vital part of this practical course.

PHY 350.2: Industrial Training

This course is designed to introduce the students to the everyday practices in the industries. The students are attached to the related industries for a period ranging from three to six months under the national SIWES programme. The students are supervised by the high level industrial personnel. University supervisors make unannounced visits to the sites to monitor the progress of the students at least twice during the department. The students are expected to write a details report of their programme and present an oral report to the staff and students of the department” after the programme.

PHY 35I.1 Electronics I

To introduce students to the techniques of electronic measurements and application of relevant electronic instruments and components. Electron emission and the devices (Schottky, Zeener, Tunnel and LED etc) semi conductor devices (FET, MSFET and Tunnel Diodes), Oscillatos Different types of amplifiers, e.g. transistor amplifiers, operational amplifiers, power amplifiers and differential amplifiers. Filters and rectification process-half and full wave, rectification-smoothing, three phase rectifier network. Analysis and design of multistage amplifier network, junction diodes, light emitting diode photo-cell

PHY 356.2 Advanced Electronics Workshop Electronics (students

This course is designed to introduce the students with specialization in Electronics to basic principles of electronic experimentation. Simple’ experiments that show how electricity is controlled by using devices called components and IC’s would be applied to illustrate the principles of circuit designing. Other topics to be covered will include testing and designing of circuits, trouble shooting, analysis, hoe to solder, case study and a mini-designed and tested circuit.

PHY 362.1 Geophysical Exploration I—Gravity and Magnetics

This course is a continuation of PHY 361.1 and is an introductory aspect of Geophysical exploration using gravity and magnetic methods. Gravitational acceleration and potential: Application of Newton’s Law. The earth’s gravitational field and its relation to Gravity Exploration. Instruments for measuring gravity on land and Fundamental principles and Instruments. Basic concepts; Magnetism of the earth. Susceptibility of Rocks: Magnetic effects of Bodies. Interpretation of magnetic data.

PHY409.1 Physical Optics

Wave equation in rectangular and polar coordinates, superposition of waves; production of coherent sources by division of wave fronts and of amplitude; applications. Michelson and Jamin Interferometers with applications. Multiple beam interference by division of amplitude and wave front-Fabry-perot etalon, Fresnel and Fraunboffer diffraction patterns, polarization of lights.

PHY434.2 Atomic and Nuclear Physics

Nuclear structure and properties; Nuclear models and nuclear reactions; vector model of the atom. Nuclear spectroscopy; X-ray spectra; alkali spectra. Azeeman and Stark effect. Fundamental particles, strong and weak electromagnetic interactions. Resonance.

PHY442.1 Solid State Physics I

Crystal structure, Diffraction Studies in solids and X-ray crystallography and its experimental methods. Theory of solid, classical free electron theory, quantum theory of electron gas and the band theory of solids. Electrical and thermal properties of solids.

PHY443.2 Solid State Physics II

Bond theory of insulators and semi-conductors, Lattice Vibrations, Models for lattice heat capacity, classical model, Einstein model, Debye model, phonons, thermal conductivity, dielectrics and ferroelectrics, Magnetism in solids, magnetic resonance, imperfections in solids, Super-conductivity

PHY 435.1 Mechanical Properties of Materials

Behavior of different types of materials under stress. Mechanical properties of materials in tension, compression direct shear, torsion flexure. True stress-strain. Cold work, hardness, impact and fatigue characteristics of materials. Creep and stress rupture. Effect of temperature/environment on mechanical behavior of materials. Mechanism of slip, slip systems. Criteria of resolved shear stress and mechanical twinning and deformation in polycrystalline materials. Impurity effect and yield point phenomena. Introduction to elements of dislocation theory dislocation reactions. Multiplication movement under force. Dislocation interaction with impurities and point defects.

PHY 452.2 Electronics II

This course introduces students to the application of feedback theory in measurement and digital electronics. Feedback theory; type, networks and applications. The concept of small, medium, large and very large integration and their consequences, Boolean algebra and, the nature of two-value variables. Boolean functions and production methods. Logic gates and switching devices, logic design, and minimization techniques reliability design synchronous sequential and combination logic circuits. Analysis of logic gates of various families. Some digital building, blocks. Flip-flip counters, latch registers and doctors. Diode logic, RTL, DECL, Moss and MOSIC. Introduction to D/A and AID conversion, principles. Microprocessors, microprocessor control, flow charts, programs, simple

Instruction set and control programs. .

PHY457.2 Network Analysis

This course involves the application of basic mathematical principle to electric circuits. In general, network analysis is concerned with determining the response, given the excitation and the ne.ty.ork11n network synthesis, the student will be taught how to design the network given the excitation and desired response. The course outline include:

Current analysis including modal and mesh analysis, equivalent circuits, phasor and complex notations. Signals, systems and waveform. The frequency, Fourier analysis, Different equations, Network Analysis, Network elements, Initial and final conditions, transfer function concepts and types of response, Transform, Properties of Transforms, uses, Partial Fraction Expansions, Poles and Zeros, evaluation of Residues, Initial and Network functions, Two-port parameters, transfer function, Incidental Dissipation, Ladder.

PHY461.1 Geophysical data processing I

Introduction to Data Processing — Process of enhancement of seismic data. Operating characteristics of digital computers used in Data Processing. Digital Filtering Convolution. Practical aspects of data processing. Seismic section and presentation. Practical processing flow.

PHY 462.1 Geophysical prospecting II— Other Methods

Electrical Prospecting methods including DC Resistivity Methods; Telluric Magnetotellutic, induced Polarization, Use of Electrical Methods of prospecting for ground water.

PHY436.2 Powder Metallurgy and Ceramics microstructure of materials. Factors affecting physical and mechanical poperties of powder. Powder blending, compacting, sintering etc. Sources of mineral raw materials for powder production. Introduction to ceramics: Ceramics processing techniques. Forming and thermal treatment of clay materials to obtain ceramic products. Glasses, glazes, enamels and metals (metallization). Equilibrium and reactions between ceramics. Recrystallization, grain growth and microstructure of ceramics that make them unique.

PHY44I.2 Modern Materials Trends

Physics of coating paints, Gels and Nanomaterial’s. Surface coating terminology and classification. Thin film coatings (metallic, optical, semiconductor and selective materials), production and applications of Nano materials. Paint Manufacture and applications. Types of adhesives and binders. Theory of adhesion developments and adhesive strength. Formulation of adhesives. Production of Gels and colloids and their applications. Othercurrent and future innovative materials.

PHY449.2 Project

Topics for research projects will be assigned near the end of the students third year. The projects may be of a theoretical or experimental nature.

PHY450.2 Seminar

Emphasis will be on topics of current interest in all areas of physics and applied physics.

PHY455.1 Electronic Instrumentation II

Primary sensing elements: Electrical filters, Mechanical springs, Pressure sensitive elements, Flow-rate sensing elements. The principles and practical aspects of transducers (types of transducers and other systems used to measure and control some physical parameters such as: Force, acceleration, temperature, pressure, light intensity, humidity, vibration. Signal conditioning and conversion, Transducers bridge, Instrumentation amplifiers, analog-Digital data and sampling:

AID and DIA converters, interference, grounding, screens and shielding, noise reduction. Signal recovery; signal filtering, signal averaging, signal correlation, signal coding. Uses of operational amplifier and digital systems. Modulation and filter circuits. Characteristics of metal powders. Basic principles of compacting and powder processing. Porous and dense products as they relate to microstructure of materials. Factors affecting physical and mechanical properties of powder. Powder blending, compacting, sintering etc. Sources of mineral raw materials for powder production. Introduction to ceramics: Ceramics processing techniques. Forming and thermal treatment of clay materials to obtain ceramic products. Glasses, glazes, enamels and metals (metallization). Equilibrium and reactions between ceramics. Recrystallization, grain growth and microstructure of ceramics that make them unique.

PHY44I.2 Modern Materials Trends

Physics of coating paints, Gels and Nanomaterial’s. Surface coating terminology and classification. Thin film coatings (metallic, optical, semiconductor and selective materials), production and applications of Nano materials. Paint Manufacture and applications. Types of adhesives and binders. Theory of adhesion developments and adhesive strength. Formulation of adhesives. Production of Gels and colloids and their applications. Other current and future innovative materials.

PHY449.2 Project

Topics for research projects will be assigned near the end of the students third year. The projects may be of a theoretical or experimental nature.

PHY45O.2 Seminar

Emphasis will be on topics of current interest in all areas of physics and applied physics.

PHY455.1 Electronic Instrumentation II

Primary sensing elements: Electrical filters, Mechanical springs, Pressure sensitive elements, Flow-rate sensing elements. The principles and practical aspects of transducers (types of transducers and other systems used to measure and control some physical parameters such as: Force, acceleration, temperature, pressure, light intensity, humidity, vibration. Signal conditioning and conversion, Transducers bridge, Instrumentation amplifiers, analog-Digital data and sampling: AID and DIA converters, interference, grounding, screens and shielding, noise reduction. Signal recovery; signal filtering, signal averaging, signal correlation, signal coding. Uses of operational amplifier and digital systems. Modulation and filter circuits.

PHY 463.2 Geophysical Data Processing II

Special techniques of enhancement of geophysical data including.

multiple suppression techniques, migration, Amplitude-versus — offset

(AVO). Current techniques etc.

PHY 464.2 Practical Methods

This course is designed to introduce the students to specialization in the techniques for data collection, and analysis through experiments. Simple experiments in applied geophysics with emphasis on practical work will be carried out. New techniques will also be introduced when they arise.

ELECTIVES PHY 412.1 Problem solving and Technical Writing

The aim of this course is to introduce students to an important aspect of any research finding — Reporting, presenting your results in an attractive way. Also, it is important that an undergraduate student should be able to define, analyze and possibly attempt to find solutions to the problem. The course will cover: Introduction to problem formulation, identification, analysis and solutions. The main scientific approach to different types of problem. Examples could be drawn from the natural world, engineering and the prevailing, environmental, problems. At the end of this section, the student should be able to formulate, analyze and suggest solutions to social problems in a scientific manner.

General introduction to technical writing (hints on planning, current, presentation and conclusions), Different types of writing and how they relate to the audience. Specific presentation of thesis with special reference to layout, abstract, introduction, conclusion and referencing other materials. Writing a dissertation, journal paper, technical reports. Presenting seminars, special projects and research reports. Project proposals and how to apply for research grants. Writing the first draft, editing and rewriting you own writing. Writing the submittal letters. Responding to corrections suggested by reviewers and correcting proofs. The importance of units and their abbreviations, general abbreviation s and standard symbols. Figures and how to captions your figures. Expression to avoid and apply in your writings.

PHY 411.2 Applied Geophysics (for non-Geophysics majors)

Introduction to Applied Geophysical methods including gravity methods, electrical and magnetic method, electromagnetic surveys, seismic methods, nuclear geophysical methods. Areas of application of the above methods;’ introduction to data processing and interpretation. Geophysical instrument involved in-the various methods.

PHY44I.2 . Powder Metallurgy

Solidification of liquid metals and alloys, casing processes and defects. Cold and hot working processes of pressing, forging, extrusion, deep drawing, rolling, casting, etc. metallography —Optical microscope and introduction to electron microscopy.

PHY 454.2 Microwaves (Antennas and Propagation)

Theory dipole ‘antenna arrays, beam shaping. Types of antennas, antenna gain: E.M wave propagation, Noise, guided waves and wave guide structure. Cavity resonators and types of resonators.

PHY 490.2 Numerical Methods

Solution of ordinary differential equations: Linear equations, finite difference method for boundary value problems. Non-linear equations, Runge-Kutta and Shooting algorithms. Method of quasi-linearization. Partial differential •equations: parabolic equations, explicit finite, differences scheme. Implicit scheme. Elliptic and hyperbolic equations and finite differences. Finite element methods.

GLY 102.2 Introduction Lab/ Field Practice in Geology

This is purely a Laboratory and fieldwork course. It includes megascopic identification of common rock-forming minerals and common rock types. Interpretations of simple topographic and geologic maps. Identification of index macrofossils and correlation exercises and geochemical analysis.

GLY 201.1 Stratigraphy and Historical Geology

Element of Chrono, Litto, Bio, Magneto and Seismic stratigraphy. Global regression and transgression. Principles of stratigraphy. Stratigraphic terminology, nomenclature, classification and procedure. Stratigraphic correlation, fades analysis. Basins and stragigraphic evolution of sedimentary basins (emphasize Benue Trough) and Geohistory analysis. Practical to include fades map, correlation and stratigrahic cross-sections.

MTH 250.2 Elementary Differential Equations

First order ordinary differential equations: Existence and uniqueness. Second order differential equations with constant coefficients. General theory of the nth order linear equations. Laplace transform solution of initial value problem. SturnLioville equations in two independent variables. Application of C.D.C. and RD.E. of physical, life and social sciences.

MTH 324.1 Complex Analysis I

Functions of a complex variable. Limits and continuum of functions of a complex variable. Differentiating Cauchy-Rieman equations. Analytic functions. Bilateral transformations, conformal mapping, contour integrals. Cauchy’s theorem and its consequences. Convergence of sequences and series of function of a complex variables. Power series, Taylor series. Laurent expansion. Isolated singularities and residues.

GLY 346.1 Elementary Surveying

Review of vectors. Equations of curves and surfaces. Vector differentiation and applications. Gradient, divergence and curl. Vector integrals, line: surface and volume integrals. Green’s Stroke’s and tensor algebra. Symmetry: Cartesian Tensors.

MTH 432.2 Mathematical Methods

Calculus o variation: Lagrange’s functional and associated density. Necessary condition for a weak relative Extremum Hamilton’s principles. Lagrange’s equations and geodesic problems. The Du Bois-Raymond equation and corner condition. Variable end-points and related theorems. Sufficient conditions for a minimum. Isoperimetric problems. Variational integral transforms. Laplace, Fourier and Hankel transforms. Complex variable methods convolution theorems. Application to solution of differential equation. Pre-requisite.

PHY443.2 Solid State Physics II

Bond theory of insulators and semi-conductors, Lattice Vibrations, Models for lattice heat capacity, classical model, Einstein model, Debye model, phonons, thermal conductivity, dielectrics and ferroelectrics, Magnetism in solids, magnetic resonance, imperfections in solids, Super-conductivity

PHY 435.1 Mechanical Properties of Materials

Behavior of different types of materials under stress. Mechanical properties of materials in tension, compression direct shear, torsion flexure. True stress-strain. Cold work, hardness, impact and fatigue characteristics of materials. Creep and stress rupture. Effect of temperature/environment on mechanical behavior of materials. Mechanism of slip, slip systems. Criteria of resolved shear stress and mechanical twinning and deformation in polycrystalline materials. Impurity effect and yield point phenomena. Introduction to elements of dislocation theory dislocation reactions. Multiplication movement under force. Dislocation interaction with impurities and point defects.

PHY 452.2 Electronics II

This course introduces students to the application of feedback theory in measurement and digital electronics. Feedback theory; type, networks and applications. The concept of small, medium, large and very large integration and their consequences, Boolean algebra and, the nature of two-value variables. Boolean functions and production methods. Logic gates and switching devices, logic design, and minimization techniques reliability design synchronous sequential and combination logic circuits. Analysis of logic gates of various families. Some digital building, blocks. Flip-flip counters, latch registers and doctors. Diode logic, RTL, DECL, Moss and MOSIC. Introduction to D/A and AID conversion, principles. Microprocessors, microprocessor control, flow charts, programs, simple

instruction set and control programs. .

PHY457.2 Network Analysis

This course involves the application of basic mathematical principle to electric circuits. In general, network analysis is concerned with determining the response, given the excitation and the ne.ty.ork11n network synthesis, the student will be taught how to design the network given the excitation and desired response. The course outline include:

Current analysis including modal and mesh analysis, equivalent circuits, phasor and complex notations. Signals, systems and waveform. The frequency, Fourier analysis, Different equations, Network Analysis, Network elements, Initial and final conditions, transfer function concepts and types of response, Transform, Properties of Transforms, uses, Partial Fraction Expansions, Poles and Zeros, evaluation of Residues, Initial and Network functions, Two-port parameters, transfer function, Incidental Dissipation, Ladder.

PHY461.1 Geophysical data processing I

Introduction to Data Processing — Process of enhancement of seismic data. Operating characteristics of digital computers used in Data Processing. Digital Filtering Convolution. Practical aspects of data processing. Seismic section and presentation. Practical processing flow.

PHY 462.1 Geophysical prospecting II— Other Methods

Electrical Prospecting methods including DC Resistivity Methods; Telluric Magnetotellutic, induced Polarization, Use of Electrical Methods of prospecting for ground water.

PHY436.2 Powder Metallurgy and Ceramics microstructure of materials. Factors affecting physical and mechanical poperties of powder. Powder blending, compacting, sintering etc. Sources of mineral raw materials for powder production. Introduction to ceramics: Ceramics processing techniques. Forming and thermal treatment of clay materials to obtain ceramic products. Glasses, glazes, enamels and metals (metallization). Equilibrium and reactions between ceramics. Recrystallization, grain growth and microstructure of ceramics that make them unique.

PHY44I.2 Modern Materials Trends

Physics of coating paints, Gels and Nanomaterial’s. Surface coating terminology and classification. Thin film coatings (metallic, optical, semiconductor and selective materials), production and applications of Nano materials. Paint Manufacture and applications. Types of adhesives and binders. Theory of adhesion developm’ents and adhesive strength. Formulation of adhesives. Production of Gels and colloids and their applications. Othercurrent and future innovative materials.

PHY449.2 Project

Topics for research projects will be assigned near the end of the students third year. The projects may be of a theoretical or experimental nature.

PHY45O.2 Seminar

Emphasis will be on topics of current interest in all areas of physics and applied physics.

PHY455.1 Electronic Instrumentation II

Primary sensing elements: Electrical filters, Mechanical springs, Pressure sensitive elements, Flow-rate sensing elements. The principles and practical aspects of transducers (types of transducers and other systems used to measure and control some physical parameters such as: Force, acceleration, temperature, pressure, light intensity, humidity, vibration. Signal conditioning and conversion, Transducers bridge, Instrumentation amplifiers, analog-Digital data and sampling: AID and DIA converters, interference, grounding, screens and shielding, noise reduction. Signal recovery; signal filtering, signal averaging, signal correlation, signal coding. Uses of operational amplifier and digital systems. Modulation and filter circuits.

PHY 463.2 Geophysical Data Processing II

Special techniques of enhancement of geophysical data including. multiple suppression techniques, migration, Amplitude-versus — offset (AVO). Current techniques etc.

PHY 464.2 Practical Methods

This course is designed to introduce the students to specialization in the techniques for data collection, and analysis through experiments. Simple experiments in applied geophysics with emphasis on practical work will be carried out. New techniques will also be introduced when they arise.

 

ELECTIVES PHY 412.1 Problem solving and Technical Writing

The aim of this course is to introduce students to an important aspect of any research finding — Reporting, presenting your results in an attractive way. Also, it is important that an undergraduate student should be able to define, analyze and possibly attempt to find solutions to the problem. The course will cover: Introduction to problem formulation, identification, analysis and solutions. The main scientific approach to different types of problem. Examples could be drawn from the natural world, engineering and the prevailing, environmental, problems. At the end of this section, the student should be able to formulate, analyze and suggest solutions to social problems in a scientific manner.

General introduction to technical writing (hints on planning, current, presentation and conclusions), Different types of writing and how they relate to the audience. Specific presentation of thesis with special reference to layout, abstract, introduction, conclusion and referencing other materials. Writing a dissertation, journal paper, technical reports. Presenting seminars, special projects and research reports. Project proposals and how to apply for research grants. Writing the first draft, editing and rewriting you own writing. Writing the submittal letters. Responding to corrections suggested by reviewers and correcting proofs. The importance of units and their abbreviations, general abbreviation s and standard symbols. Figures and how to captions your figures. Expression to avoid and apply in your writings.

PHY 411.2 Applied Geophysics (for non-Geophysics majors)

Introduction to Applied Geophysical methods including gravity methods, electrical and magnetic method, electromagnetic surveys, seismic methods, nuclear geophysical methods. Areas of application of the above methods;’ introduction to data processing and interpretation. Geophysical instrument involved in-the various methods.

PHY44I.2 . Powder Metallurgy

Solidification of liquid metals and alloys, casing processes and defects. Cold and hot working processes of pressing, forging, extrusion, deep drawing, rolling, casting, etc. metallography —Optical microscope and introduction to electron microscopy.

PHY 454.2 Microwaves (Antennas and Propagation)

Theory dipole ‘antenna arrays, beam shaping. Types of antennas, antenna gain: E.M wave propagation, Noise, guided waves and wave guide structure. Cavity resonators and types of resonators.

PHY 490.2 Numerical Methods

Solution of ordinary differential equations: Linear equations, finite difference method for boundary value problems. Non-linear equations, Runge-Kutta and Shooting algorithms. Method of quasi-linearization. Partial differential •equations: parabolic equations, explicit finite, differences scheme. Implicit scheme. Elliptic and hyperbolic equations and finite differences. Finite element methods.

GLY 102.2 Introduction Lab/ Field Practice in Geology

This is purely a Laboratory and fieldwork course. It includes megascopic identification of common rock-forming minerals and common rock types. Interpretations of simple topographic and geologic maps. Identification of index macrofossils and correlation exercises and geochemical analysis.

GLY 201.1 Stratigraphy and Historical Geology

Element of Chrono, Litto, Bio, Magneto and Seismic stratigraphy. Global regression and transgression. Principles of stratigraphy. Stratigraphic terminology, nomenclature, classification and procedure. Stratigraphic correlation, fades analysis. Basins and stragigraphic evolution of sedimentary basins (emphasize Benue Trough) and Geohistory analysis. Practical to include fades map, correlation and stratigrahic cross-sections.

MTH 250.2 Elementary Differential Equations

First order ordinary differential equations: Existence and uniqueness. Second order differential equations with constant coefficients. General theory of the nth order linear equations. Laplace transform solution of initial value problem. SturnLioville equations in two independent variables. Application of C.D.C. and RD.E. of physical, life and social sciences.

MTH 324.1 Complex Analysis I

Functions of a complex variable. Limits and continuum of functions of a complex variable. Differentiating Cauchy-Rieman equations. Analytic functions. Bilateral transformations, conformal mapping, contour integrals. Cauchy’s theorem and its consequences. Convergence of sequences and series of function of a complex variables. Power series, Taylor series. Laurent expansion. Isolated singularities and residues.

GLY 346.1 Elementary Surveying

Review of vectors. Equations of curves and surfaces. Vector differentiation and applications. Gradient, divergence and curl. Vector integrals, line: surface and volume integrals. Green’s Stroke’s and tensor algebra. Symmetry: Cartesian Tensors.

MTH 432.2 Mathematical Methods

Calculus o variation: Lagrange’s functional and associated density. Necessary condition for a weak relative Extremum Hamilton’s principles. Lagrange’s equations and geodesic problems. The Du Bois-Raymond equation and corner condition. Variable end-points and related theorems. Sufficient conditions for a minimum. Isoperimetric problems. Variational integral transforms. Laplace, Fourier and Hankel transforms. Complex variable methods convolution theorems. Application to solution of differential equation. Pre-requisite

 

MATHEMATICS COURSES

 

FOR MATHEMATICS EDUCATION:

S/N

NAME

QUALIFICATION

AREA OF SPECIALIZATION

DESIGNATION

1.

David, E.E.

B.Sc ., M.Sc., Ph.D

Algebra

Senior Lecturer

2.

Asibong-Ibe U.I.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Algebra

Senior Lecturer

3.

Ekaka, A.E.N.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Modelling

Lecturer  I

4.

Bazuaye, F.E.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Numberical Analysis  

Lecturer  I

5.

Olisa, O.D.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Applied Mathematics 

Lecturer I

6.

Ikonwa, I.O.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Applied Mathematics 

Lecturer I

7.

Udo-Akpan I.U.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Applied Mathematics 

Lecturer I

8.

Jackreece, P.C.

B.Sc ., M.Sc., Ph.D

Functional Differential Equation

Lecturer II

9.

Nzeram F.E.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Applied Mathematics

Lecturer II

10.

Alimi A.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Mathematics

Assistant Lecturer

11.

Oahimire J.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Mathematics

Assistant Lecturer

 

 

Course offered by Mathematics Education Students

 

YEA    YEAR ONE FIRST SEMESTER                          

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 100.1

Communication Skills in English

3

2.

GES 102.1

Introduction to Philosophy  and Logic

2

3.

EDU 100.1

Introduction  to Education

2

4.

EDU 101.1

Introduction to Teaching Profession

2

5.

EDU 103.1

Theory & Practice of Physical  Activity Skills & Techniques 1

1

6.

MTH 110.1

Algebra and Trigonometry

3

7.

MTH 120.1

Calculus

3

8.

PHY 101.1

Mechanical and Properties of Matter

3

               TOTAL

 

19

 

YEA    YEAR ONE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 101.2

Computer Appreciation & Application

3

2.

GES 103.2

Nigerian Peoples and Culture

2

3.

EDC 101.2

Instructional Technology

2

4.

EDU 103.2

Theory & Practice  of Physical Activity Skills & Technique 11

1

5.

MTH 114.2

Introduction to Set, Logic and Numbers

3

6.

MTH 124.2

Co-ordinate Geometry

3

7.

PHY 112.2

Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism

3

              TOTAL

 

17

 

YEA    YEAR TWO FIRST SEMESTER                         

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.1

Developmental Psychology

2

2.

EDU 201.1

History of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.1

Classroom Management

2

4.

EDU 2CS.1

Community Service

1

5.

MTH 210.1

Linear Algebra

3

6.

MTH 220.1

Introduction to Real Analysis

3

7.

MTH 260.1

Probability and Statistics

3

8.

MTH 270.1

Numerical Analysis

3

                TOTAL

 

19

 

                YEAR TWO SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.2

Art of Teaching

3

2.

EDU 201.2

Foundation of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.2

Sociology of Education

2

4.

EDU 202.3

Micro-Teaching

1

5.

EDU 202.2

Element of Special Education

2

6.

EDU 204.2

Supervised Teaching Practice I

2

7.

MTH 224.2

Mathematics Methods

2

8.

MTH 226.2

Real Analysis I

3

9.

MTH 262.2

Mathematics Statistics I

3

10.

MTH 250.2

Elementary Differential Equations

3

             TOTAL

 

23

 

YEA    YEAR THREE FIRST SEMESTER                      

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 300.1

Curriculum Development and Instruction

2

2.

EDU 301.1

Philosophy of Education

2

3.

EDU 302.1

Psychology of Learning

3

4.

EDU 303.1

Supervision and Leadership Behaviour in Education

2

5.

EDU 305.1

Educational Technology

2

6.

MTH 320.1

Real Analysis II

3

7.

MTH 340.1

Ordinary Differential Equation

3

8.

STA 360.1

Mathematics Statistics II

3

9.

STA 370.1

Operational Research

3

              TOTAL

 

23

 

YEA    YEAR THREE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 300.2

Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

2

2.

EDU 301.2

Methods Courses in Discipline Area

2

3.

EDU 302.2

ICT in Education

2

4.

EDU 303.2

Research Methods and Statistics

3

5.

EDU 304.2

Supervised Teaching Practice II

4

6.

EDC 305.2

Lab. Org. & Management

3

7.

EDU 306.2

Media Systems

3

8.

MTH 342.2

Mathematics Methods II

3

                TOTAL

 

22

 

YEA    YEAR FOUR FIRST SEMESTER                       

S/N

COURSE

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 400.1

Management in Education

2

2.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

3.

EDU 401.1

Test and Measurement

2

4.

EDU 402.1

Computer Education

2

5.

MTH 420.1

Functional Analysis

3

6.

MTH 440.1

Partial Differential Equation

3

7.

STA 466.1

Optimization Methods

3

              TOTAL

 

19

 

YEA    YEAR FOUR SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

2.

EDU 402.2

Guidance a d Counseling

2

3.

EDU 404.2

Comparative Education

2

4.

EDU 405.2

Continuous Assessment

2

5.

MTH 492.2

Numerical Methods

3

6.

MTH 474.2

Probability Theory

3

7.

STA 472.2

Time Series

3

              TOTAL

 

19

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR EDUCATION COURSES HOUSED IN THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION/DEPARTMENT

EDU 100.1: Introduction to Education (1 Unit)

This course presents a general introduction to Education as a discipline and as a profession. Students will be introduced to the scope of education, its roles in society and why teachers study education. Added to this, the course will introduce students to knowledge of specialized areas in education. These include Educational Management, Psychology, Guidance and Counseling and Foundations, Educational awareness of their interrelationships and importance.

EDU 101.2: Instructional Technology (2 Units)

This course exposes students to the different misconceptions of the field of educational technology. This is followed by modern definition of educational technology. The course presents the different classes of audiovisual materials and their production, to produce/improvise and audiovisual material for use during teaching practice.

EDU 200.2: Art of Teaching (2 Units)

This course is supposed to develop teacher’s competence in school pedagogy. It explores the teaching process in relation to the purpose of education, human growth and personality, the nature of learning, the dynamics of groups, the nature of subject matter and evaluation. The course will provide opportunity for stimulated microteaching

EDU 2CS.1: Community Service (1 Unit)

This is a community-based practical exercise in which students will develop curriculum packages to solve societal problems. This will take the form of workshops at community halls, village squares etc. It will also entail developing training packages for illiterate skilled and unskilled craftsmen in both urban and rural settings.

EDU 300.1: Curriculum Development and Instruction (2 Units)

This is a basic course, which exposes students to curriculum development models, patterns of curriculum organization, sequencing of curriculum content. The course system will lay emphasis on how to produce relevant curriculum for the 9-3-4 system of education in Nigeria. The relationship between evaluation and effective curriculum development will be explicated.

EDU 301.2: Method Course (2 Units)

The course is designed to expose teachers to the various teaching methods. The characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of each method will be explored. The concept of individualization of instruction as an innovative teaching approach will be presented. Different individualized teaching strategies will also be presented. Efforts will be geared towards producing a highly purposeful and self-directed learner and to turn a teacher from being a dispenser of information to a facilitator of learning.

EDU 303.2: Basic Statistics and Research Methods (3 Units)

The course is designed to acquaint students with the nature and scope of statistics. It covers basic descriptive statistics-data collection, measures of frequency distribution, central tendency and dispersion. Students are introduced to inferential statistics – parametric and non-parametric tests as a means for scientific study. Introduction to research – definitions and values. Types of research, descriptive, experimental, quasi-experimental, phenomenology etc. and steps in conducting research, problem formulation, methodology and data analysis and reporting. Documentation in research – various formats: Harvard citation, Vancouver (numbering) and American Psychological Association (APA) style will be presented.

EDU 305.2: Laboratory Organization and Management (1 Unit)

Shortage and handling of chemicals care, use and maintenance of basic laboratory equipment e.g balance, microscope, electrical meters, batteries etc. handling of glassware, purification of water by distillation – management of practice class. Management of a Laboratory store – taking inventory, issuance of materials, retrieval of materials and safety in the laboratory.

EDU306.2: Media Systems

This course exposes students to modern information Technology gadgets as they apply to classroom instruction. This course will emphasize the process approach to instructional development and the integration of appropriate media materials.

EDU 401.2: Computer in Education (2 Units)

Curriculum specialists can no longer ignore the impact of computer technology in this 21st century. To overcome the problems inherent in being computer illiterate, this course will expose students to the rudiments of computer literacy. Students will be exposed to the use of application software, the internet, and the application of the principles of information and communication technology to education.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR MATHEMATICS EDUCATION HOUSED IN THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS, FACULTY OF SCIENCE.

MTH 110.1 Algebra and Trigonometry

Element notions of sets, Subsets, Union, Intersection, Compliments, Venn Diagrams. Real Numbers Integers, Rational and Irrational, Mappings of a set. Real functions and their compositions. Quadratic functions. Cubic function, Roots of quadratic and cubic functions. Partial fractions. Equations with complex roots. Complex number. Geometric representation ‘of complex numbers, De Moirvers, Series and sequences, Principle of mathematical induction, Binominal theorem. Trigonometry functions of angles. Circular functions. Addition theorems. Double and half angles. PRE-REQUISITE (0/LEVEL OR SSCE MATHS).

MTH 120.1 Calculus

Function of a real variable, graphs, limits and idea of continuity, The derivative as limit of rate of change, Techniques of differentiation, Extreme curve sketching; integration as an inverse of differentiation, Methods of integration, Definite integrals, Application to areas, volumes.

PHY 101.1 Mechanics and Properties of Matter

Topics covered in this course will include the following: Motion in one dimension, motion in a plane, work and energy, conservation laws, collision, solid friction, rotational kinematics and rotational dynamics, equilibrium of rigid bodies, oscillations, gravitation, fluid static and fluid dynamics, Surface tension, viscosity and hydrostatics.

PHY 112.2 Introductions to Electricity and Magnetism

This is the introductory course on Electricity and Magnetism. Topics covered all will include: the Electric field, Gauss’s Law, Electric potential, Capacitor and Dielectric, current and resistance, electromotive force and circuits, the magnetic field, Ampere’s Law, faraday’s Law of induction.

Text: Electromagnetism and Modern Physics for physical Science by Evwaraye and Mgbenu.

GES 101.2 Computer Appreciation and Application

History of computers, Generation and classification of computers; IF model of a computer; components of a computer system hardware and software; programming language; organization of data; data computer techniques; introduction to computer network. Use Keyboard as an input device: DOS, Windows, Word Processing, are Spreadsheet: Application of Computers to Medicine, Social Science Humanities, Education and Management Sciences.

GES 100.1 Communication Skill in English

The course seeks to develop the students a well-informed attitude to the English language and to equip them with the knowledge of English communication and study skill that will facilitate their work in University and beyond.

GES 102.1 Introduction to Logic and Philosophy

A brief survey of the scope, notions, branches and problems of philosophy symbolic logic, specific symbolic logic. Conjunction, affirmation, negations, disjunction, equivalence and conditional statements. Law of thought. The method of deduction, using rule of inference and bi-conditions. Quantitative theory.

GES 103.2 Nigeria Peoples & Culture

The overall objective of this course is to help students understand the concept of culture and its relevance to human society especially as it relates to development. In more specific terms, the course will be designed to help the students know the history of various Nigerian cultures beginning with pre-colonial Nigeria society. Colonialism constitutes a vital watershed in Nigerian history. Thus the course will identify the influence of colonialism on Nigerian culture, and focus 01 contemporary Nigerian culture explaining issues that relate to the political economic, educational, religious and social institutions in the nation. The course outline includes the concept of culture; pre-colonial culture and languages of Nigeria; principles of kinship, descent an in Nigerian culture; the colonial impact; Nigerian economic education and development in Nigeria; religion in Nigeria culture, environment and health practices in Niger relations.

MTH 114.2 Introduction to Sets, Logic and Algebra

MTH 114.2a Set Theory — with proofs of set theoretic theorems involving union, intersection, and compliments of sets, Difference set De Morgan’s Laws, Power Sets; Poset Diagrams, Cardinality of a Set, Product sets and relations on sets,         Logic — Statements and statement formula, connectives and truth tables. Implication and equivalence. Quantifiers and quantified statements truth functions. Substitution and replacements in statements. Elementary notions of prepositional and predicate logic proofs. Rules of inference Technology (direct, indirect, eliminations and contradiction). Demonstration of proof.

MTH 114.2b

Relations and Equivalence relations on a set Mappings — types of mappings (injective and subjective and subjective mappings. Inverse mappings, composition of mappings. Permutation on a set

  • Peano axioms. Integers — divisibility, division algorithm, g.e.d., congruence modulo, Diophantine equation, Primes and prime decomposition. Chinese remainder theorem.
  • System of Linear Equations, Solution of Linear Equation, Matrices and Systems of Linear Equation. Row operations on matrices and echelon forms. Determinants of a matrix PRE-REQUISITE (SSCE/MTH 110.1)

MTH 124.2 Coordinate Geometry

Straight lines, circles, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola. Tangents, normal. Addition of Vectors. Scalar and Vector products. Vector equation of a line and place. Kinematics of a particle. Components of velocity and acceleration of a particle moving in a plane. Force, momentum, laws of motion, under gravity projectiles, resisted vertical motion, elastic string, simple pendulum impulse. Impact of two smooth sphere. Addition of Vectors.

 

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES

Academic and Professional Staff of   the Department o f Computer Science

 

ACADEMIC STAFF

 S/N

NAME

QUALIFICATION

AREA OF SPECIALIZATION

DESIGNATION

1.

Nwachukwu E.O.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Software Engineering Network, AI

Professor & HOD

2.

Asagba, Prince O.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D

Network Security, Programming Database Mgt.

Senior Lecturer

3.

Ugwu, C.

B.Sc., M.Sc., NCS

CPN

Natural Language Processing Programming

Associate Professor

4.

Onuodu, F.E.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Natural Language Processing, AI

Lecturer I

5.

Egbono, F.

B.Sc

Computer Science

Lecturer I

6.

Eke, B.O.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Software Engineering Programme

Senior Lecturer

7.

Onyejegbu, F.N.

B.Sc., M.Sc., NCS

CPN

Machine Learning

Senior Lecturer

8.

Wobidi, E.

B.Sc., M.Sc

Database Mgt System, Artificial Intelligence

Lecturer II

9.

Ogheneov Edward

B.Sc., M.Tech., B.Sc

Database, AI, Programming

Assistant Lecturer 

 

Professional staff in Computer Science Department

S/NO

Names of Staff

Qualification

Designation

  1.  

Emecheta N.C.

B. Tech (FUTO) M.Sc. (Benin)rt

Chief Programmer

  1.  

Ekeocha A. C.

B. Eng (UPH)

Senior Technologist

  1.  

Adams E.P.

ND (Bori) HND (UPH)

Senior Technologist

  1.  

West I.S.

B. Tech (RSUST)

Technologist 1

 

 

COURSES OFFERED BY COMPUTER EDUCATION STUDENTS AND

COURSE DESCRIPTION

YEA    YEAR ONE FIRST SEMESTER                                 

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 100.1

Communication Skills in English

3

2.

GES 102.1

Introduction to Philosophy  and Logic

2

3.

EDU 100.1

Introduction  to Education

2

4.

EDU 101.1

Introduction to Teaching Profession

2

5.

EDU 103.1

Theory & Practice of Physical  Activity Skills & Techniques I

1

6.

MTH 110.1

Algebra and Trigonometry

3

7.

MTH 120.1

Calculus

3

8.

PHY 101.1

Mechanics and Properties of Matter

3

9.

PHY 102.1

Laboratory Practices I

1

10.

CSC 180.1

Introduction to Computer and Basic Programming

2

               TOTAL

 

22

 

YEA    YEAR ONE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 101.2

Computer Appreciation & Application

3

2.

GES 103.2

Nigerian Peoples and Culture

2

3.

EDC 101.2

Instructional Technology

2

4.

EDU 103.2

Theory & Practice  of Physical Activity Skills & Technique 11

1

5.

MTH 114.2

Introduction to Set, Logic and Numbers

3

6.

MTH 124.2

Co-ordinate Geometry

3

7.

PHY 102.2

Laboratory Practices II

1

8.

PHY 112.2

Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism

3

9.

CSC 180.2

Introduction to Computer Application

3

              TOTAL

 

21

 

YEAR TWO FIRST SEMESTER                                

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.1

Developmental Psychology

2

2.

EDU 201.1

History of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.1

Classroom Management

2

4.

EDU 2CS.1

Community Service

1

5.

CSC 280.1

Introduction to Computer Programming

3

6.

CSC 283.1

Introduction to Information System and File Structure

3

7.

CSC 284.1

Introduction to Digital System

3

8.

CSC 288.1

Structured Programming (Pascal)

3

                TOTAL

 

19

 

                YEAR TWO SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 200.2

Art of Teaching

3

2.

EDU 201.2

Foundation of Education

2

3.

EDU 202.2

Sociology of Education

2

4.

EDU 202.2

Micro-Teaching

1

5.

EDU 202.2

Element of Special Education

2

6.

EDU 204.2

Supervised Teaching Practice I

2

7.

CSC 282.2

Computation Programming

2

8.

CSC 285.2

Digital Systems

2

9.

CSC 286.2

Data Structures

2

10.

STA 262.2

Mathematics Statistics 

3

             TOTAL

 

21

YEA   

            YEAR THREE FIRST SEMESTER                      

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 300.1

Curriculum Development and Instruction  

2

2.

EDU 301.1

Philosophy of Education

2

3.

EDU 302.1

Psychology of Learning

3

4.

EDU 303.1

Supervision and Leadership Behaviour in Education

2

5.

EDU 305.1

Educational Technology

2

6.

CSC 382.1

Computer Architecture

3

7.

CSC 392.1

Automata Theory, Computability and Formal Languages

3

8.

CSC 394.1

Operation System

3

                  TOTAL

 

20

 

YEA    YEAR THREE SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

GES 300.2

Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

2

2.

EDU 301.2

Methods Courses in Discipline Area

2

3.

EDU 302.2

ICT in Education

2

4.

EDU 303.2

Research Methods and Statistics

3

5.

EDU 304.2

Supervised Teaching Practice II

4

6.

EDC 305.2

Lab. Org. & Management

3

7.

EDU 306.2

Media Systems

3

                   TOTAL

 

19

 

YEA    YEAR FOUR FIRST SEMESTER                       

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 400.1

Management in Education

2

2.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

3.

EDU 401.1

Test and Measurement

2

4.

EDU 402.1

Computer Education

2

5.

CSC 480.1

Data Base Management

3

6.

CSC 486.1

System Analysis and Design

3

7.

CSC 496.1

Comparative Programming Language

3

8.

CSC 498.1

Data Communications and Network

3

              TOTAL

 

22

 

YEA    YEAR FOUR SECOND SEMESTER

S/N

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CU

1.

EDU 401.2

Research Project in Education

4

 

EDU 402.2

Guidance and Counseling

2

2.

EDU 404.2

Comparative Education

2

3.

EDU 405.2

Continuous Assessment

2

4.

CSC 494.2

Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

3

5.

STA 474.2

Probability Theory

3

6.

STA 477.2

Simulation and Modeling

3

              TOTAL

 

19

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR EDUCATION COURSES HOUSED IN THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION/DEPARTMENT

EDU 100.1: Introduction to Education (1 Unit)

This course presents a general introduction to Education as a discipline and as a profession. Students will be introduced to the scope of education, its roles in society and why teachers study education. Added to this, the course will introduce students to knowledge of specialized areas in education. These include Educational Management, Psychology, Guidance and Counseling and Foundations, Educational awareness of their interrelationships and importance.

EDU 101.2: Instructional Technology (2 Units)

This course exposes students to the different misconceptions of the field of educational technology. This is followed by modern definition of educational technology. The course presents the different classes of audiovisual materials and their production, to produce/improvise and audiovisual material for use during teaching practice.

EDU 200.2: Art of Teaching (2 Units)

This course is supposed to develop teacher’s competence in school pedagogy. It explores the teaching process in relation to the purpose of education, human growth and personality, the nature of learning, the dynamics of groups, the nature of subject matter and evaluation. The course will provide opportunity for stimulated microteaching.    EDU 2CS.1: Community Service (1 Unit)

This is a community-based practical exercise in which students will develop curriculum packages to solve societal problems. This will take the form of workshops at community halls, village squares etc. It will also entail developing training packages for illiterate skilled and unskilled craftsmen in both urban and rural settings.

EDU 300.1: Curriculum Development and Instruction (2 Units)

This is a basic course, which exposes students to curriculum development models, patterns of curriculum organization, sequencing of curriculum content. The course system will lay emphasis on how to produce relevant curriculum for the 9-3-4 system of education in Nigeria. The relationship between evaluation and effective curriculum development will be explicated.

EDU 301.2: Method Course (2 Units)

The course is designed to expose teachers to the various teaching methods. The characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of each method will be explored. The concept of individualization of instruction as an innovative teaching approach will be presented. Different individualized teaching strategies will also be presented. Efforts will be geared towards producing a highly purposeful and self-directed learner and to turn a teacher from being a dispenser of information to a facilitator of learning.

EDU 303.2: Basic Statistics and Research Methods (3 Units)

The course is designed to acquaint students with the nature and scope of statistics. It covers basic descriptive statistics-data collection, measures of frequency distribution, central tendency and dispersion. Students are introduced to inferential statistics – parametric and non-parametric tests as a means for scientific study. Introduction to research – definitions and values.Types of research, descriptive, experimental, quasi-experimental, phenomenology etc. and steps in conducting research, problem formulation, methodology and data analysis and reporting. Documentation in research – various formats: Harvard citation, Vancouver (numbering) and American Psychological Association (APA) style will be presented.

EDU 305.2: Laboratory Organization and Management (1 Unit)

Shortage and handling of chemicals care, use and maintenance of basic laboratory equipment e.g balance, microscope, electrical meters, batteries etc. handling of glassware, purification of water by distillation – management of practice class. Management of a Laboratory store – taking inventory, issuance of materials, retrieval of materials and safety in the laboratory.

EDU306.2: Media Systems

This course exposes students to modern information Technology gadgets as they apply to classroom instruction. This course will emphasize the process approach to instructional development and the integration of appropriate media materials.

EDU 401.2: Computer in Education (2 Units)

Curriculum specialists can no longer ignore the impact of computer technology in this 21st century. To overcome the problems inherent in being computer illiterate, this course will expose students to the rudiments of computer literacy. Students will be exposed to the use of application software, the internet, and the application of the principles of information and communication technology to education.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION HOUSEDIN THE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE, FACULTY OF SCIENCE

COURSE DESCRIPTION

GES 100.1 Communication Skill in English

The course seeks to develop in the students a well-informed attitude to the English Language and to equip them with the knowledge of English communication and study skills that will facilitate their work in the University and beyond.

GES 102.1 Introduction to Logic & Philosophy

A brief survey of the scope, notions, branches and problems of philosophy, symbolic logic, specific symbols in symbolic logic, Conjunction, Affirmation, negation, disjunction, equivalence and conditional statements, Law of thought, The method of deduction, using rule of inference and bi-conditions, Quantitative theory.

MTH 110.1 Algebra and Trigonometry

Element notions of sets, Subsets, Union, Intersection, Compliments, Venn Diagrams. Real Numbers Integers, Rational and Irrational, Mappings of a set. Real functions and their compositions. Quadratic functions. Cubic function, Roots of quadratic and cubic functions. Partial fractions. Equations with complex roots. Complex number. Geometric representation ‘of complex numbers, De Moirvers, Series and sequences, Principle of mathematical induction, Binominal theorem. Trigonometry functions of angles. Circular functions. Addition theorems. Double and half angles. PRE-REQUISITE (0/LEVEL OR SSCE MATHS).

MTH 120.1 Calculus

Function of a real variable, graphs, limits and idea of continuity, The derivative as limit of rate of change, Techniques of differentiation, Extreme curve sketching; integration as an inverse of differentiation, Methods of integration, Definite integrals, Application to areas, volumes.

PHY 101.1 Mechanics and Properties of Matter

Topics covered in this course will include the following: Motion in one dimension, motion in a plane, work and energy, conservation laws, collision, solid friction, rotational kinematics and rotational dynamics, equilibrium of rigid bodies, oscillations, gravitation, fluid static and fluid dynamics, Surface tension, viscosity and hydrostatics.

CSC 180.1 Introduction to Computer Science and BASIC Programming

History and development of computers: functional components of a computer, characteristics of a computer, Number systems, Boolean Algebra, Flowcharts; algorithms; Symbolic names, lists and arrays, subscripts, expressions and control statements in computer programming, Programming in BASIC, Computer application, strategy for computer programming, Rules that guide the writing of BASIC programs/statements. Library functions, User-defined functions, Subprograms & subroutine in BASIC.

Practical Section

A student must pass a practical course to be administered in the computer laboratories which will emphasis on the implementation of the programming constructs taught in the class before he or she will pass the course. The aim is to inculcate in students’ the ability to solve problems related to the programming language taught and to increase the Entrepreneurial skills of the students.

GES 101.2 Computer Appreciation and Application

History of computers, Generation and classification of computers; IF model of a computer; components of a computer system hardware and software; programming language; organization of data; data computer techniques; introduction to computer network. Use Keyboard as an input device: DOS, Windows, Word Processing, are Spreadsheet: Application of Computers to Medicine, Social Science Humanities, Education and Management Sciences.

MTH 114.2 Introductions to Sets, Logic and Algebra

MTH 114.2a Set Theory — with proofs of set theoretic theorems involving union, intersection, and compliments of sets, Difference set De Morgan’s Laws, Power Sets; Poset Diagrams, Cardinality of a Set, Product sets and relations on sets,         Logic — Statements and statement formula, connectives and truth tables. Implication and equivalence. Quantifiers and quantified statements truth functions. Substitution and replacements in statements. Elementary notions of prepositional and predicate logic proofs. Rules of inference Technology (direct, indirect, eliminations and contradiction). Demonstration of proof.

MTH 124.2 Coordinate Geometry

Straight lines, circles, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola. Tangents, normal. Addition of Vectors. Scalar and Vector products. Vector equation of a line and place. Kinematics of a particle. Components of velocity and acceleration of a particle moving in a plane. Force, momentum, laws of motion, under gravity projectiles, resisted vertical motion, elastic string, simple pendulum impulse. Impact of two smooth sphere. Addition of Vectors.

GES 103.2 Nigeria Peoples & Culture

The overall objective of this course is to help students understand the concept of culture and its relevance to human society especially as it relates to development. In more specific terms, the course will be designed to help the students know the history of various Nigerian cultures beginning with pre-colonial Nigeria society. Colonialism constitutes a vital watershed in Nigerian history. Thus the course will identify the influence of colonialism on Nigerian culture, and focus 01 contemporary Nigerian culture explaining issues that relate to the political economic, educational, religious and social institutions in the nation. The course outline includes the concept of culture; pre-colonial culture and languages of Nigeria; principles of kinship, descent an in Nigerian culture; the colonial impact; Nigerian economic education and development in Nigeria; religion in Nigeria culture, environment and health practices in Niger relations.

PHY 112.2 Introducing to Electricity and Magnetism

This is the introductory course on Electricity and Magnetism Topic hovered all will include the Electric field, Gauss’s Law, Electric, Capacitor and Dielectric, current and resistance electromotive force and circuits, the magnetic field, Ampere’s Law, faraday’s Law of induction.

CSC 280.1.Introduction to Computer Programming

Principles of programming. Program design, algorithms, flowcharts, pseudo codes. Programming with FORTRAN: declarations, input/output, loops, decisions, arithmetic/assignment statements. Arrays and subroutines.

Practical Section

A student must pass a practical course to be administered in the computer laboratories which will emphasis on the implementation of the programming constructs taught in the class before he or she will pass the course. The aim is to develop the students’ ability to solve problems related to the programming language taught and to inculcate Entrepreneurial skills to the students.

CSC 283.1 Information Systems and File Structures

Data hierarchy: bits bytes, data types, records, files. File design: serial and sequential files, random and index sequential files. File maintenance: master flies, transaction files, etc. Tape and disk devices: timing, record blocking1 etc.

CSC 284.1 Introduction to Logic Design

Numerical representations; Digital and analogue systems; Representing binary quantities-fixed number representations, floating-point representations; Digital circuits/Logic circuits; Parallel and serial transmission; Memory; Digital computers. Binary-to- decimal conversions decimal-to-binary conversions; Binary arithmetic; BCD code; Alphanumeric codes-ASCII, EBCDIC, Unicode, etc.; Parity codes, parity method for error detection.

CSC 288.1 Structured Programming

Principles of good programming style, expression; structured programming concepts; control flow-invariant relation of a loop; stepwise refinement of both statement and data; program modularization (Bottom up approach, top-down approach, nested virtual machine approach); languages for structured programming debugging testing verifying code inspection; semantic analysis. Test construction.

Program verification, test generation and running. .The use of PASCAL to illustrate these concepts. String processing, Record Structures, file Processing, Dynamic data, types for lists, etc. Recursion for tree search, sorting, etc. writing efficient programs. Turbo PASCAL project management facilities.

Practical Section

A student must pass a practical course to be administered in the computer laboratories which will emphasis the implementation of the programming constructs taught in the class, before he or she will pass the course. The aim is to improve students’ ability to solve problems using the programming technique taught and to enhance the Entrepreneurial skills of the students.

CSC 282.2 Database Programming

Characteristics of business programming. Records, files. File creation, accessing. Record accessing, insertion, updating, deletion. Searching and retrievals. Programming with dBase, and MS Access, or other suitable language. Introduction to SQL.

Practical Section

A student must pass a practical course to b administered in the computer laboratories which will emphasis the implementation of the programming constructs taught in the class before he or she will pass the course. The aim is to develop students’ ability to solve problems related to the application of database taught and to inculcate Entrepreneurial skills to the students.

CSC 285.2 Digital Design and Microprocessor

Practical design and operation of the laboratory equipment. Digital signal generation and transmission. Sequential circuit contd. Flip flips or latches. Registers and counters. Arithmetic circuits-parallel and serial binary adders-half adders and full adders. Binary substracters half subtractors and full subtractors and synthesis of simple synchronous control mechanisms. Data and address bases:

Addressing and accessing methods. Memory segmentation, practical methods of timing-pulse generation, Comparison of Commonly used codes e g ASCII, BCD, EXCESS-3 etc parity generation and detection; code generators.

CSC 286.2 Data Structures

Bits, Bytes, words4jnearstructures and lists structures; arrays, tree structures, sets and relations, higher level language data types and data-handling facilities Techniques for storing structured data list, files, tables trees, etc their space and access time properties, algorithm for manipulating linked lists, binary, b-trees, b*trees, and A VIAL trees. Algorithm for transversing and balancing trees.

GES 300.1 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

History and the development of entrepreneurship, the entrepreneur Qualities and characteristics; the entrepreneur and business environment; identify business opportunity; starting and developing new business ventures; Legal forms business ownership and Registration. Types of business Ownership; Feasibility Studies; Role of Small and Medium Scale Enterprise (SME) in the Economy; Role of government on Entrepreneurship; Business Location and Layout; Accounting for SME: Financing SME; Managing SME; Marketing in SME; risk Management of SME; Success and Failure factor of SME; Prospects and Challenges of Entrepreneurship; Ethical Behaviour in Small Business.

CSC 382.1 Computer Architecture I

Basic logic design and Circuits; Data representation; instruction formats; Computer Architecture; Study architecture simple mini-computer. Assembly languages and as stage operation of the assembler. Machine instruction Programs and Link Editors.

CSC 394.1 Operating Systems

Principles of operating systems; Types of operating system multi- programming multiprocessing. Processes, inter communication, synchronization, deadlocks storage mar and resource allocation illustrated from a popular operating such as UNIX.

Practical Section

A student must pass a practical course to be administered in the computer laboratories which will emphasis on the implementation; o the programming construct taught in the class before he or she will pass the course. The aim is to encourage students’ ability to solve problems related to the programming language taught and to increase the Entrepreneurial skills of the students.

CSC 396.1 Automata theory, Computability and Formal Languages

The role of programming language. Benefits of high level language. Programming paradigms: imperative, logic, functional and object- oriented programming. General/multi purpose programming languages. Language design and language evaluation criteria. Program structures and representations. Types, objects and declarations. Expressions and statements. Subprograms. Data structures. Input/output. Introductory notions in formal languages. Relationship to programming languages. Issues in programming languages; syntax, semantics, language constructions — declarations, statements, variables binding, loop. Blocks, procedures, parameter parsing, scope ‘of variables. Grammars, productions, parsing and pattern matching. Translating infix and postfix expressions.

CSC 480.1 Database Management

Basic concepts. Data integration. Data independence. Functions and architecture of a DBMS. Data models. Storage structures and access strategies. Relations and relational operations. Relational algebra and calculus. Normalization. Security and integrity issues. Relational systems, INGRES, DBASE entity — relationship model. E-R. diagrams. Semantic and semantic nets. I’S.

CSC 486.1 Systems Analysis And Design

Introduction to systems analysis, structured and object-oriented analysis and design, structured and object-oriented tools, the systems life cycle. Organizational structure. Systems investigation. Feasibility studies. Determination and evaluation of alternatives designs of input, and output. Documentation. Choice of system characteristics (Hardware and software). Testing, conversion. Parallel runs. Evaluation of system performance. Maintenance.

CSC 496.1 Programming Languages

Introduction to 4th and 5th Generation Programming Languages, The role and comparison of programming languages generations. Benefits of Fourth and Fifth Programming languages. Data manipulative - based fourth generation language- Structured Query Language Programming, logic based Fourth Generation Languages-Ruby and/Python, Advanced Queries and Object-Oriented Query handling. General purpose/multi-purpose representations in 4GL— Input/output, Types, objects and declarations. Expression and statements. Methods, Practical Illustrations.

Practical Section

A student must pass a practical course to be administered in the computer laboratories which will emphasis on the implementation of the programming constructs taught in the class before he or she will pass the course. The aim is to encourage students’ ability to solve problems related to the programming language taught and to increase the Entrepreneurial skills of the students.

CSC 498.1 Computer Network and Data Communications

Introduction, waves Fourier analysis, measure of communication channel characteristics, transmission media, noise and distortion, modulation and demodulation; multiplexing TDM FDM and FCM. Parallel and serial transmission (synchronous vs anachronous). Bus structures and loop systems, computer network. Examples and design consideration: data switching principles; broadcast techniques; network structure for packet switching, protocols, description of network e.g. ARPANET, DSC etc.

Practical Section

A student must pass a practical course to be computer laboratories which will emphasis the techniques and constructs taught in the pass the course. The aim is to encourage taught to solve problems related to the Entrepreneurial skills of the students.

CSC 494.2 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Definition of Artificial Intelligence. Scope and applications of Artificial Intelligence. Problem solving techniques; searching. Logic and inference knowledge-base systems. Natural languages. Pattern Recognition and vision systems. Expect system-architecture, construction and use.

 

ACADEMIC POLICIES

The following information was extracted from the Statement of Academic Policies document of the University of Port – Harcourt 2012 edition. The Statement of Academic Policies was first issued in 1977, reviewed in 1983 and 1990 to reflect the re-organization from the school system to faculty system and changes in line with the NUC Minimum Academic Standard. the present revision reflects the changes made by Senate of the University between 1995 and 2004. Students should familiarize themselves with this document.

Department Entry Requirement

  • Entry requirements shall be same as those stated by the University of Port Harcourt statement of Academic Policies of the University and those of the collaborating Faculties and Departments from which students of the faculty take their teaching subjects. The general entry requirements minimum is five credits at the GCE, SSCE, NECO, or NABTEB including a credit pass in English Language and Mathematics or TC 11 with five Merits, including English. Success in the UTME examination is also required. (See the Jamb Brochure for details).
  • Candidates, who obtain a credit level pass in the University of Port Harcourt Certificate Programmes in the faculty or that of any other recognized University, qualify for admission. Such candidates must in addition have credits in five subjects in the West African School Certificate Examination or its equivalents, including the teaching subject of a candidate’s choice and success in UTME Examination. This category of students may also be required to pass the screening interview.

Registration of Courses

  • Each student is required to register all courses to be offered during each Academic Session at the time stipulated for registration for the Academic Session, which is usually within the first week of resumption, except where otherwise indicated. Course registration is done on-line. It is the responsibility of the Department (Head of Department and Academic Advisers) to ensure that   all previously failed courses in the programme are re-registered.  Furthermore, the total credit units registered for any Academic Session should not be less than 15 or more than 24 per semester. Students are not allowed to sit for examinations in courses for which they had not previously registered. Such actions are fraudulent.
  • Any registration completed after the time specified by the University, will be null and void and will not be credited to the student even when he/she had taken and passed the examination in the course.
  • Any genuine request for late registration / adding or dropping a course must be made in writing to the Head of Department only through a form obtainable from the registry and dully approved not later than four weeks before examination.

Grading System

The following system of Grade Points shall be used:

Mark/Score

Letter Notation

Grade Point (GP)

70% & above

A

5.00

60-69

B

4.00

50-59

C

3.00

45-49

D

2.00

40-44

E

1.00

0-39

F

0.00

Students should sit for examinations in all registered courses. Any student who fails to sit for examination in a course dully registered for without satisfactory reason earns the grade of “F” in the course.

Computation of Grade Point Average

  • Each course carries a fixed number of Credit Units (CU); one Credit Unit shows the number of hours a   class meets per week, for one hour credit Unit course, the class meets for one hour per week for one semester. Three hours credit units’ course per week. Means the class holds for three hours either in the class room, laboratory, workshop or field per week.. Quality Points (QP) are derived by multiplying the Credits Units for the course by the Grade Points (GP) earned by the student: e.g. in a course with 3 Credit Units in which a student earned a B with 4 Grade Points, the Quality Points are: 3 x4= 12.
  • Grade Point Average (GPA) is derived by dividing the Quality Points for the semester by the Credit Units for the semester: e.g. in a semester where the student earned 56 Quality Points for 18 Credit Units, the GPA is: 56/18 = 3.0.
  • Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is derived by adding the Total Quality Points (TQP) to date and dividing by the Total Credit Units (TCU) to date: e.g. if the TQP are 228 and the TCU are 68, the CGPA is: 228/ 68=3.35. Detailed example of how to calculate GPA and CGPA is as presented in the Table overleaf:

 

Typical Example for GPA and CGPA Computation

First Year, Semester One

Course Code

Credit Units (CU)

Letter Grade

Grade Point (QP)

Quality Point (GP) = (CU x GP)

GES 100.1

3

B

4

12

GES102.1

2

C

3

6

EDU 100.1

2

C

3

6

EDU103.1

1

F

0

0

CHM130.1

3

E

1

1

FSB1OI.1

3

D

2

6

Phy 101.1

3

A

5

15

Total

15

 

18

46

Calculation of GPA For First Semester:

Total Credit Unit, TCU = ZCU = 15

Total Quality Paint, TQP = ZQP =46

Grade Point Average (GPA) TQP/TCU = ZQP/CU =46/15 = 3.006

First Year, Semester Two

Course Code

Credit Units (CU)

Letter Grade

Grade Point (QP)

Quality Point (GP) = (CU x GP)

GES 101.2

3

C

3

9

GES 103.2

2

D

2

4

EDU 101.2

2

A

5

10

EDU103.2

1

B

4

4

CHM131.2

3

A

5

15

CHM 132.2

3

C

3

9

FSB132.2

3

E

1

3

Total

17

 

 

54

Calculation of GPA for Second Semester:

Total Credit Unit, TCU = ECU =17

Total Quality Point, TQP = ZQP =54

Grade Point Average (GPA) TQPITCU EQP/CU =54/17=3..1

Calculation of CGPA at the end of the First year, (First and second Semesters):

Total Credit Unit, TCU = ECU = (15+17) 32

Total Quality Point, TQP = EQP = (46 + 54) = 100

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) = TQP/TCU =EQP/ZCU =100/32=3.01

  • N:B: The following points are noteworthy for GPA and CGPA computation:

Grades obtained in all approved courses of a student’s prescribed programme, excluding audited courses, shall be used to compute the GPA. Where a student has registered more than the allowed number of free elective courses, only the grades obtained in the allowed number of elective courses, chosen in the order of registration, will be used in computing the CGPA. Other elective courses will be treated as audited courses and will not be used in calculating the CGPA.

Where a student was registered for a course but the result is unavailable, due to no fault of the student, no result will be recorded for that course and the student will-register for it in the next academic year.

  • When a student transfers from one Department to another, only the grades obtained in the courses in the new prescribed programme of study will be used to compute the CGPA. Courses which were completed before the change of programme and which are not part of the new prescribed programme, will be treated as adited courses.

 

Duration for Degree Programme.

The  degree programme last for a minimum of four academic sessions and maximum of six academic sessions.

Continuation, Probation and Withdrawal, The essential points on the subject matter are as highlighted below:

Continuation Requirement

The continuation requirement in the University is a CGPA of 1.50 at the end of every academic year.

Probation

Probation is a status granted to a student whose academic performance falls below an acceptable standard. A student whose Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is below 1.50 at the end of a particular year of study earns a period of probation for one academic session.

Limitation of Registration

Students on probation may not register for more than 18 units per semester. The purpose of the restriction is to give the students a chance to concentrate on improving their performance and thus raising their CGPA.

Warning of Danger of Probation

Students should be warned by their Department if at the end of any Semester their GPA falls below 1.50

Repeating Failed Course Unit(s)

Subject to the conditions of withdrawal and probation, a student must repeat the failed course unit(s) at the next available opportunity, provided that credit units carried during that semester does not exceed 24, and the Grade Points earned at all attempts shall count towards the CGPA.

Temporary Withdrawal from Study

A student may apply for temporary withdrawal from study for a period of one year, which may be renewed up to a maximum of 2 years.

Withdrawal

A student whose Cumulative Grade Point Average is below 1.50 at the end of one year’s probation shall be required to withdraw from the programme.

Auditing of Courses

Students may attend courses outside their prescribed programme. The courses shall be recorded in their transcript only if they have registered for it with the approval of the Head of their Department and the Dean of the Faculty and taken the prescribed examination. An audited course shall not be used in calculating the CGPA.

Academic Advisers

Every student is attached to an Academic Adviser who is a member of the academic staff and who will advise him/her on academic affairs as well as on personal matters. Academic Advisers are expected to follow their students’ academic progress and provide counseling to them. It  the duty of the Head of Department to assign an Academic Adviser to each student at the beginning of each session. Academic Advisers should give clear information on their office doors about  times and places at which they will be available to students who wish to consult them.

Classification of Degrees

The degree shall be awarded with 1st, 2nd Upper, 2nd Lower, or 3rd Class Honors. The cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) for these classes shall be;

 

 

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

Class of Degree

New Students

1st Class

4.50-5.00

2nd Class upper

3.50-4.49

2nd Class Lower

2.40-3.49

3rd Class

1.50-2.39

 

General Remarks

All the students admitted into the first year in the Department of Curriculum Studies and Educational Technology must have met the entry requirements stipulated by the University and Department; thus, eligible to pursue the available careers in the Department. The students should be serious with class attendance, assignment and examination in the courses registered for. However, experience has shown that many students relax their efforts in the early years of study, apparently assuming that they would make up the lost efforts in their later years of study. This assumption is false and deceitful.

Here, at the University of Port Harcourt, every registered course (except officially dropped:

  • Requires a minimum of 75% attendance to lecture/tutorial and /or Laboratory Practice.

Must be assessed continuously through assignment, tests and examination.

  • Must have a grade returned for every student who registered for it, which must comprise of at least 30% from the continuous assessment and 70% from the examination Therefore each course in the programme contribute toward the cumulative grade point average(CGP) with its weight credit units, which may be 1,2or3 credit units ,except for 3rd year Teaching Practice and final year Project whose weights are 4 credit units respectively.

Therefore, for the ambitious student, hard work begins from year 1 and spans through year 4. Failing grades can thwart your ambition. However, hard work according to your abilities should be the focus and not cheating.

Student is advised to completely avoid vices (such as secret cultism and examination malpractice) that will ultimately put them out of humble focus in the pursue of their ambition. They are rather encouraged to -be obedient, Humble and law abiding and to act in such a *er as to achieve their Primary purpose of aspiring for University education. In Nigeria and all over the world top jobs opportunities are usually reserved graduates with excellent or very good degree classification such as 1st class or 2nd class upper division .TO qualify to be a lecturer in the University the first degree grade of aspirants should not be below 2nd class upper and to qualify for admission into a Post- Graduate degree programe at the University of Port Harcourt a minimum of 3.0 CGPA is required.

The 1St class is equivalent to the attainment of at least ‘A’, ‘B’ average (a minimum final CGPA of (5+4)/2 = 4.50) during the course of study. To achieve this, one must earn very few ‘Cs’, say, two or three and more ‘As’ than ‘Bs’ in all the courses. Earning even one ‘E’ grade and/or ‘Ds’ can be fatal.

The 2nd class upper division is equivalent to the attainment of at least ‘B’, ‘C’ average (a minimum final CGPA of 4+3)/2 = 3.50) during the course of study. To achieve this, one must earn very few ‘Ds’, say, two or three, and many ‘Bs’ and ‘As’. Earning few ‘Es’ and ‘Ds’ can be fatal.

The ‘high’ 2nd class lower division is equivalent to the attainment of an average grade of ‘C’ (a minimum final CGPA of 3.0) during the course of study. To achieve this, one must be an average student.

Note:

1. Students should note that all prescribed courses must be passed before graduation. If there is any failed course at the end of the first 4 years, an extra year has to be used to remedy the failed courses. This process is repeated at the end of the 5th year if a course is still not passed. At the end of the 6th year, the student must leave the university with a “fail out”.

2. A student who abandons his/her programme after 4 years will earn a grade of F” for each course being carried over in the 5th and 6th years. The student will “fail out” at the end of the 6th year.

 

SENATE’S POLICIES ON EXAMINATIONS MALPRACTICE

Definition of Examination Malpractice

Examination malpractice shall be defined as all forms of cheating, which directly or indirectly falsify the ability of the students. These shall include cheating within an examination hail, cheating outside an examination hail and any involvement in all examination related offences. Forms of cheating are categorized as follows:

Cheating within an Examination Hall/Room

  • Copying from one another or exchanging questions/answer sheets.
  • Bringing in prepared answers, copying from textbooks, notebooks, laboratory specimens and any other instructional aides smuggled into the hall.
  • Collaboration with Invigilator/Lecturer, where it involves the lecturer-invigilator providing written/oral answers to a student in the examination hall.
  • Oral/written communication between and amongst students.
  • Bringing in prepared answer written on any part of the body.
  • Receiving information whether written or oral from any person(s) outside an examination hail when examination is going on.
  • Refusal to stop writing at the end, within haIf a minute in an examination.
  • Impersonation.
  • Illegal removal of answer scripts from the examination hail.
  • A check-off system of students who have actually submitted answer scripts should be devised.

*Excerpts from the University Statement of Academic Policies

Other Form of Examination Malpractice

Plagiarism is a form of examination malpractice and should be investigated and punished in the same way as cheating in the examination hall/room. Plagiarism is the use of another person’s work (i.e. in writing term papers, final year project, seminar presentation, etc) without appropriate acknowledgement both in the text and in the references at the end.

 Punishment for Examination Malpractice

Any student found guilty of examination malpractice after due process shall be dismissed from the University. This decision shall be pasted on all notice boards throughout the University and shall be contained in each Faculty Prospectus so as to give it the widest possible publicity.

 Examination

I. Supervisors must identify and check students into the examination hall using the authenticated register of students for the course. The student must show the invigilator his registration /identity card on entry to every examination. He/she must leave these on the desk throughout the examination for easy inspection by the invigilator.

II. All examination scripts used by the students must be endorsed by the supervisor at last 30 minutes after the commencement of the examination and must be retrieved after the examination.

Ill. The invigilator must ensure that no students remove from the examination venue any paper or other examination material except the printed examination question paper when it is allowed. Answer booklets must not be in the possession of students, they are property of the University.

vi. A student should be in the examination hall at least 30 minutes before the start of the examination  A student who is up to 30 minutes late should be admitted, but should not be given extra time .A student who arrives 30 minutes after the srart of the examination shall not be admitted. A student may be allowed to leave the examination hall temporarily before the end of the examination but must NOT:

 (a)Do so during the first hours of the examination except in cases of emergency like illness.

(b) Do so unaccompanied and with the script.

v. Every student must write his name, registration number and sign the attendance register within the first hour of the examination.

Vi. Each student shall write his number (not name) at the appropriate places on the cover and pages of the answer booklet.

Vii. No student shall leave any handbag, brief case, books notebooks and paper near him/her during the examination.

Viii. No student shall directly or indirectly give or accept any assistance during the examination, including lending/borrowing any materials.

IX. No student shall continue writing when at the end of the allotted time, the invigilator orders all students to stop writing.

xi. A student shall avoid noise-making and/or communicating with any other student or with any other person, except with the invigilator if necessary.

xii.   Students who disrupt an examination at any venue will have their examination cancelled and they will be required to re-register

xiii.  These regulations apply to all students studying for the award of University of Port Harcourt degrees, diplomas and certificate.

Procedure for Review of Scripts by Aggrieved Student

i. Any student who is aggrieved about the grading result of a course examination may petition his/her head of department in the first instance through the Dean. The Head of Department shall refer the petition to the Dean of the Faculty who shall cause the scripts to be reassessed and the scores presented to the Faculty Board for determination.

ii. A student applying for a review of answer scripts shall be required to pay N500.OO to the Bursary Department before commencement of the review.

iii. If the appeal results in a significant improvement (i.e. a change in letter grade) on the student’s original grade, the fee so paid shall be refunded to the student within 30 days from the release of the result. The student whose letter grade is marked lower, losses his money.

iv. Application for review of answer script must be made not later than one month from the date of publication of results by the faculty.

v. The application must be personal, i.e. an appeal by someone for the review of someone else’s script shall not be entertained

 vi. No result/ grade approved by the Faculty Board shall be changed without reference to the Faculty Board.

VII. No result/grade approved by Senate shall be changed without reference to Senate.

VIII. Application for a change of grade must be accompanied in writing by:

(a) Clearly defined reasons for the change.

(b) Evidence that the request has been considered and approved by department/Faculty Board.

Procedure for Investigation of Examination Malpractice.

 Any unauthorized material found in the possession of a student shall be seized , the student  must  acknowledging that it was retrieved from him. Refusal to sign is tantamount to:

I. Acceptance of guilt.

II. Where the student refuses to sign, the Lecturer (lnvigilator) should make a clear statement on the Answer sheet and sign.

iii. The student, however, shall not be prevented from finishing the examination

iv. The invigilator shall, immediately after the examination submit a written report to the Head of Department conducting the examination.

v. The report shall include the following information slated overleaf:

  • NAME OF STUDENT/STAFF;
  • STUDENT’S REGISTRATION/MATRICULATION NUMBER;
  • STUDENT’SISTAFF’S DEPARTMENT
  • COURSE NUMBER (if applicable);
  • VENUE OF EXAMINATION (if applicable);
  • LOCATION OF EXAMINATION MALPRACTICES;
  • DATE AND TIME OF EXAMINATION (if applicable);
  • EXAMI NATION OFFENCE (with evidence/statement if any);
  • CHIEF INVIGILATORIINVIGILATOR’S SIGNATURE;
  • WITNESS SIGNATURE (if any);
  • STUDENT’S COMMENTS (if possible);
  • STUDENT’S SIGNATURE (if possible);

 

VI. The Department conducting the examination shall set up a committee/ panel to examine the merit of the case.

 vii. If the Departmental Board feels that a prima facie case has been established, the case shall be investigate the case and report back to the Faculty.

VIII. If faculty is satisfied that a case has be established, then the case should be reported to the Senate Committee on Examination Malpractices (SCEM)

 ix. The Senate Committee on Examination Malpractices (SCEM) shall investigate the case and report to Senate for decision.

 x The investigation of examination malpractices should take as must time as it takes to dispose the matter; but must not go beyond the end of the semester following the one in which the offence was allegedly involved in an examination malpractices shall be allowed to register for curse and take examinations in them. But results of the courses shall not be reported/ released by his or any other department until investigation has been completed and his innocence established by Senate.

 Punishment I Measures Against Examination Malpractices

I. Any student found guilty of examination malpractices after due process should be dismissed from the University.

II. This decision should be communicated to all students and their sponsor before the commencement of each session. The information should be pasted on all notice boards throughout the University and should also be contained in each Faculty prospectus so as to give it the widest possible publicity.

Ill. The decision should take effect immediately and should be duly published as soon as students return to classes.

IV. For students involved in an examination malpractice and proven guilty, Senate should take ultimate decision, while for staff; the appropriate Disciplinary Committee (as specified in the Conditions of Service) should forward its recommendation to Council.

 

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